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Full text of "Elchanette (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.), 1952"

ELCHANETTE 



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in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanettebrookl1952unse 



ELCHANETTE 



T 



We, the graduating classes of 1952 humbly dedicate 
this yearbook to the man who has been our guiding light 
during the years we have spent in Central. To him, we 
have brought all our difficulties and from him, we have 
always received warm and friendly advice. To this man, 
we wish to show our respect and admiration — to Rabbi 
Charles Friedman. 




DR. SAMUEL BELKIN'*, 
PRESIDENT 




MAY WE, THE MEMBERS OF THE 
ADMINISTRATION, WISH ALL OF 
YOU THE SUCCESS THAT YOUR 
ENDEAVORS SO RICHLY DESERVE. 



DR. SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE 
■ ''■" P R I N C I PAL 





DR. I SAAC LEWI N 
PRINCIPAL 



RABBI CHARLES FRIEDMAN 
ADMIN I STRaTOR 



— Four ■ 



^ M ,.A.'T 



./..I.' 



ELCHANETTE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chiej 

CYRELLA CHAVEL 

English Editor 

NAOMI WINTER 

Hebrew Editor 

EILEEN RABIN 



■ 1 ,^ 



Business Manager 
SUSAN WEISER 

Art Editor ,- ■ 

NECHIE DEUTSCH 

Hebrew Associate Editor 
■ ■ ESTHER SOLOVEITCHIK 

English Associate Editor 
MARILYN BOBER 

English^.F acuity Advisor 

MR. DAVID M. ;HORN, ,. ;, 

A~ .Hebrew Faculty Advisor 

RABBI MEYER HERSHKOVICS 



Montage • •' • ■ 

^ .,^ MORTON J. RICHTER 



'A I. 



v: 



— Five — 



FACULTY 



Principal 

DR. SHELLEY R. SAPHIRE, M.A., Ph.D. 

Hebrew Principal 

DR. ISAAC LEWIN, Ph.D. 

Administrator 

RABBI CHAS. FRIEDMAN, B.A., LL.B. 

Biology 

BERNARD ANNENBERG, B.S., M.A. 

English and Social Studies 

ROBERT BASSELL, B.A., M.A. 

Hebrew 

MOSES BERENHOLTZ, Rabbi 

Art 

IRIS COHEN, B.A. 

French 

GERTRUDE FEUER, Teachers Diploma 

French, Spanish 

HENRY FOHR, B.A. 

Hebrew Stenography 

ABRAHAM GLICKSBERG, B.A., M.A. 

Music 

EMERY GROSSMAN, Music Certificate 

Hebrew 

RABBI MAYER HERSKOVICS, B.A. 

Hebrew 

ISIDORE HOFFMAN 



English 

DAVID M. HORN, B.S.S., M.A. 

French 

JEAN JOFEN, B.A., M.A. 

Hebrew 

JECHIEL LICHTENSTEIN, Ph.D. 

History 

MARTIN LILKER, B.A., M.A. 

Health Education 

SONIA MILKMAN, B.A., M.A. 

English 

PAUL RAVETCH, B.S., M.A. 

Biology 

JERRY A. SCHUR, B.S., M.S. 

Mathematics 

ESTHER SCHWARTZ, B.A. 

Music 

SEYMOUR SILBERMINTZ, BA., M.S. 

Stenography 

ESTHER TAUB, B.S. 

Mathematics 

ISRAEL WALLACH, B.S., M.S. 

Social Studies 

IRVING UNGER, B.A., M.A. 




S^^JtiefL dnnjoliu 



Class of January 1952 




MARILYN BOBER 

Answers to: Malkie 
Usually found: Singing 
Likes: Basketball 
Dislikes: Dull people 
Destiny: History teacher. 




SYLVIA CHUSID 

'f . ^^ 

Answers to: Her name 

Usually found: Doing crossword puzzles 

Likes: Mr. Friedman 

Dislikes: Making decisions 

Destiny: Israel. 




SARAH GOLDSTEIN 

Answers to: Sandy 

Usually found: Gettiqg. excited 

Likes: Friendly people 

Dislikes: Math 

Destiny: To get a B.A. 



— Eight — 



Class of January 1952 



JEANETTE KLEIN 

Answers to: Jeanny 

Usually found: Eating carrots 

Likes: Art 

Dislikes: Candy 

Destiny: To run a school the way she wants to. 




HADASSA LICHTENSTEIN 

Answers to: Lichty 

Usually found: In the B'nai Akiva 

Likes: Music 

Dislikes: Batlonim 

Destiny: Aretz 




STELLA NOVICK 

Answers to: Cookie 
Usually found: Smiling 
Likes: Math 
Dislikes: Wasted time 
Destiny: Social worker. 




— f'iine — 




Class of January 1952 



SHEILA RABINOWITZ 

Answers to: Sheila 

Usually found: In the office 

Likes: To blush 

Dislikes: Math 

Destiny: Psychology Major 




MOLLY SERUYA 

Answers to: Anything 
Usually found: Laughing 
Likes: French 
Dislikes: No one 
Destiny: Hebrew teacher 




ESTHER SOLOVEITCHIK 

Answers to: Soloveitchik 

Usually found: Debating 

Likes: Philosophy 

Dislikes: History 

Destiny: To teach Jewish Ethics in her own way. 



— Ten — 



Class of June 1932 



SARAH H. BERLIN 

Arista Member 5-8, Arista Leader 7, 8, Vice Leader of Arista 6, 
Vice President of Class 6, Basketball Team 2-8, VoUeyb tII Team 
4-8, Music Club 5-8, Debating Club 1, Service Squad 3, 4, 5, 
Head of Service Squad i, 5, Office Squad '-^. Ch-'nuk-l: 
Dramatics 2, 4, Class Treasurer 4, 5, Typist for Elchanette 7, 8. 

The most sought after girl in the class before tests — 
Sarah R's notes are the best reference since Webster 
published his little book. Her personality is projected 
into her notes — neat, nice, and interesting. 

"G-d sends meat and the devil sends cooks." 

— Thomas Delonev. 




SONDRA ELAINE BERNSTEIN 

Cheering Squad 1, 2, 3, Spark Staff Reporter, School Debating 
Team 6, 7, 8, Music Club 5, First Aid Club 3, Hebrew Club 6, 
Office Squad 1, 2, 3, Dramatics 2, 4. 

This vivacious red has no communistic affiliations. 
Electives her specialty, she has gone home two hours 
after the class for a year and a half. When this 
crack trig, and chem. major was asked why she was 
cramming in these subjects Tziril answered, "I want 
to make college life easier so that I can spend more 
time at my knitting." 

"The heart has reasons of which reason has no 
knowledge ." — Pascal 




VIVIAN R. BLACHOR 

Class President 4, 5, Arista Member 6, 7, 8, Choir 4, 5, Head of 
Clean-up Squad 1 , Editor of Spark 4, 5, Reporter of Spark 4, 5, 
G. O. Budget Committee 5, Business Manager of Academy News 
6, Class Debating Team 4-8, Cheering Squad, School DebU'ng 
Team 6, 7, 8, Library Squad 4, Carnival Committee, Torch 
Reporter. 

The "little immigrant" from Williamsburg Viv has 
become exceedingly centralfied. She has put away 
her rural customs to fight in the most modern way 
for central reforms. 

"Whosoever would be a man should be a 
nonconformist. " — Emerson. 




Eleven - 



Class of June 1952 




CYRELLA CHAVEL 

spark Editor 5, Spark Reporter 4, Volleyball Team 5-8, 
Carnival Committee 5, Debating Team 4, 5, Editor-in-Chiej of 
Ekhanette 6, 7, 8, Arista Member 7, 8. 

Cyrella, the chief supporter and stockholder of the 
LIRR, commutes to Central daily by bus. (That's 
why it's going broke). Cyrella, as editor-in-chief of 
our yearbook, has impressed us with her great for- 
titude, patience, etc. But enough! She blushed. 

"Reading maketh a jull man; conference a ready man 
and writing an exact man." — Bacon. 




BAYLE CHESIR 

Choir 4-8, Spark Reporter, Spark Typist 4, 5, Dramatics 2, 4, 
Class Volleyball Team 5, Vice President o) Class 7, 8, Choir 
Leader 1, 2, Secretary of Hebrew 1, Music Director of School 
Productions 2, 7, 8, Typist for Ekhanette ">, 7, 8, Office Squad 
2, 4, 5, Journalism Club 6. 

Secretary of the class, Bayle has been trying, (in 
vain we admit), to make ladies of the seniors. A 
strong advocate of Robert's "Rules of Order" and 
Emily Post, Bayle swears she'll do it yet. Our class 
Choral leader, Bayle is practicing her lullabies — 
for the Mikado, of course! 

".All the world's a stage and all the men and women 
are merely players." — Shakespeare. 




NECHIE DEUTSCH 

Dramatics 1, 5, Art Staff of Torch J, 2, Art Editor of Torch 
3, 4, Art Editor of Ekhanette .?-.?, Music Club 4, .i, Art Club 
2, 3, Journalism Club 6, 7, 8, Cheering Squad 1, 2, 3, Art Staff 
of Spark 4-8, Torch Reporter 1, 3, Arista Member 7 , 8. 

Recognized around school by her posters, trade- 
marked N.D.D., Nechie has been pursuing art for 
many years and hopes to cash in one day on this 
lucrative business. Her home in Boro Park is open 
to all (including immigrants from Crown Heights). 

"Art is long and time is fleeting." — Longfellow. ■ 



Twelve 



Class of June 1952 



JOYCE FRIEDMAN 

Vice President of School 6, 7, 8, Edit or -in -C hie j of Spark 5, 
Arista Member 5-8, Spark Reporter 5-8, G. O. Budget Com- 
mittee 5, Clnss Volleyball Team 4-8, Choir 4, 5, F.dHor of 
Torch (Hebrew) 4, Academy News Staff 6, 7, 8, Secretary of 
Yiddish Club 1, Dancing Club 6, 7, 8, Assistant Hebrew Editor 
of Torch 3. 

Succeeding in everything she does, Jovce does 
almost everything, and does it charmingly. She can 
always be seen flitting through Central's halls with 
a bright smile on her face for all her constituents, 
practicing no doubt to charm the publisher of her 
yet unborn Hebrew novels. 

"Wrinkles should merely indicate where smiles have 
been." — Mark Twain. 




SIVIA HAUPTMAN 

Hebrew Club 2, 3, Arts and Crafts Club i, Music Club 6, 7 , 8, 
First Aid Chib 5, Office Squid 2-5, Spark Reporter 4, Torch 
Reporter 3, Dramatics 2, 3, 4, Class Volleyball Team 6, 7, 8, 
Choir 4, 5, Service Squad 3, 4, School .Assembly Committee 6. 

Another of our Boro Park fellow travelers (not to 
be confused with the Communists), Siv has kept our 
Hebrew teachers awake by her superior knowledge 
of the language. In English she never lets a period 
go by without a frustrated mention of Maxwell 
Anderson. (Mr. Ravetch, when can I make my 
report?) 



"What I aspire to be, 
.And was not, comforts me."- 



-Robert Browning. 




PHYLIS HAUSMAN 

Business Manager of Class 5, 6, Assistant Business Manager of 
Elchanelte 7, 8, Art Staff of Spark 4, .5, Art Editor of Spark 6, 
Journalism Club 5-8, School Debating Team, 6, 7, 8, Cheer 
Leader 2, 3, Dramatics, 1, 2, 3, Art Club 2, 3, Photography 
Club ;. 

"Quick with the quip" — Faigy's reputation as a 
punster is well known. Also on the credit side of 
her ledger is her ability to manipulate the business 
end of our journal. A strong supporter of "Daddy 
Hausman" — Faigy has kept the class in stitches 
with her father's wit. 

"True wit is nature to advantage dress'd, 
What oft was thought, but ne'er so well exprcss'd." 
— Alexander Pope. 



'm>>. 





— Thirteen — 



Class of June 1952 




ANN HOROWITZ 

Head of the Class Debating Team 4, 5, School Debating Team 
6, 7, S, Journal Reporter, Spark Reporter, Dramatics, Director 
o] Class Play 5, Music Club 6. 

Ann Horowitz, otherwise known as Chanie, is the 
only girl who can disagree with her teachers and get 
away with it. A regular on the Brighton Express, 
Chanie, the short girl with the taH vocabulary, makes 
a deep impression on all! 

"There is but one step from the sublime to the 
ridiculous." — Napoleon. 




HADASSAH J. KASHTAN 

Class President 6, Basketball Team 2-8, Volleyball Team 4-S, 
Clean-up Squad 1, 2, Dancing Club 1, 2, Class Athletic Manager 
.?, 4, Music Club 4, 6-8, First Aid Club 5, Gym Club 3, School 
Assembly 4, Chanukah Dramatics 2, 3, 4, Choir 4, S, Arista 
Member 7 , S. 

Judy, who thinks of school as a comfortable place to 
answer her letters from all points west, south, east, 
and north, still manages to get on the Central Honor 
Roll. Hadassah Judith's career is all mapped out for 
her — supervising the distribution of beds in her 
home for homeless B'nei Akivanicks. 

"Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than smiles of other maidens are." — Coleridge. 




PEARL B. KARALITZKY 

spark Reporter 5, Assistant Editor oj Spark 5, Dramatics 1, 4, 
Vice President of Class 1, President of Hebrew Club 2, Carnival 
Committee 5, Office Squad 1, First .iid Club 3, Journalism 
Club 4-8. 

Pearl, one of the class paradoxes, can be completely 
engrossed in the latest crossword puzzle during a 
class lecture. But when a teacher asks questions it's 
Pearl who knows the answers. Attractive and pop- 
ular, Pearl expects to go for her MRS. degree at 
Brooklyn College. 

"He knew the precise psychological moment when to 
say nothing." — Oscar Wilde. 



— Fourteen — 



Class of June 1952 



CELIA LEWKO 

Treasurer of Class 6, Office Squad 6, Spark Staff 6, 7,8, First 
Aid Club 5, Carnival Committee 5, Volleyball Team 6, 7, 8, 
Cheering Squad, Journalism Club, Dramatics 5. 

Celia, Rabbi Hershkovics' agent in his drive for 
package for Israel, entered Central in 4th term. Ex- 
uding an aura of class and school spirit, Tziv has 
helped us out of more than one sad fix. 

"Little deeds of kindness, little words of love, 
kelp to make earth like the heaven above." 
— Julia A. F. Carney. 




ANN MARCUS 

School Athletic Manager 4, S, Clean-up Squad 1-4, Choir 4-8, 
School Basketball Team 2-8, Class Yolleyball Team 5-8, Presi- 
dent of Gym Club, Spark Reporter, Offici Squad 4, 5, First Aid 
Club J, Dancing Club 6, Typist for College Catalogue Com- 
mittee 6, Dramatics 7, 8, Captain of Basketball Team 7, 8. 

The ail-American girl from Israel, Ann shows many 
diverse talents. Among them is her talent for sing- 
ing and dancing. However, all her capabilities do 
not run in the same vein. She has (with some assist- 
ance) captured many athletic awards for our class. 

"Come and trip it as you go on the light fantastic toe." 
— Milton. 




MARCIA J. MAZEL 

Class President 1, Basketball Team 2-8, Debating Club 1, Music 
Club 5, Dancing Club 6, Class Volleyball Team 5-8. 

Marcia claims the title of the "girl who sent us on 
our way politically." She was our first class rep- 
resentative in the G.O. and the first in a chain of 
thorns in the side of this "exalted" body. 

"Silence is the element in which great things fashion 
themselves." — Carlyle. 




Fifleen — 



Class of Jujie 1952 




PAULINE NAGEL 

Assisiant Editor of Spark, Chairman of Spark Club, Assistant 
on Carnival Committee, President of Knitting Club, Spark 
Reporter, Choir 4, S, Dramatics 4. 

Perrie bounced into our school in second term and 
has since enlivened manj' a dull hour. She is now 
being bounced out to Brooklyn College where we 
know she will receive just recognition for her effer- 
vescent humor. 

"That action is best which procures the greatest hap- 
piness for the greatest number s ." — Francis Hutcheson. 




EILEEN RABIN 

President of Yiddish Club 1, President of School 7, S, Arts and 
Crafts Club 3, Journalism Club 5-8, Secretary of Class 4, 5, 
Spark Reporter, Basketball Team 2-5, Class Volleyball Team 
4, 5, Spark Hebrew Editor 5, G. 0. Budget Committee, Arista 
Member 5-8, Hebrew Editor of Elchanetle 7 , S. 

Eileen, otherwise known as "Miss Politician '52" Jias 
been the Senior Class' answer to the Rockerfeller 
Foundation. Against all odds (namely, a depleted 
bank account ) Eileen wrangled the fantastic sum of 
$250 from our General Organization. Aside from 
this, Eileen has maintained an above 90 average in 
Mr. Hoffman's class. Truly a herculean featl 

"Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers." — Tennyson. 




ESTHER D. SCHNALL 

President of Class 7, S, Basketball Team 2-8, Dancing Club 6, 
Class Athletic Manager 7-8, Class Volleyball Team 5-8, Captain 
of Gym Class 1, 2, Choir 4, 5, Home Economics Club 4, Busi- 
ness Staff of Academy News 6, 7 , 8, Sport Editor of Spark 4, 5, 
Class Librarian 5, 4, 5, President of Gym Club 5, Dramatics 
Club 1, 2, Arts and Crafts Club J. 

Esther, well known in Central as an all around ath- 
lete, recently turned to politics when she accepted 
the position of president of the Senior class. Always 
ready with a smile, Esther will continue her studies 
at Brooklyn College. 

"Archly the maiden smiled, and, with eves overrunning 
with laughter . . . " — Longfellow. 



Sixteen - 



Class of June 1952 



CORNELIA SCHONFELD 

Head Librarian 4-8, Secretary of Home Economics Club 2, 
Dancing Club 6, Basketball Team 2-S, Captain Basketball Team 
, 4-6, Art Club 5, Athletics Club 4, Publicity Manager of Spark 6, 
Head of Carnical Committee 6, Volleyball Team 4, 5, Office- 
Squad 2-3. 

Kranchy is the only girl in Central who has answered 
to the title "Head Librarian" for six terms. Among 
other of her talents is her skill at Basketball — 
Kranch has always been our first casualty in greeting 
the Basketball season. (Central's team always starts 
off with a Bang! ) 

"Howe'er it be, it seems to me, 
Tis only noble to be good." — Tennyson 




BARBARA SHAPIRO 

Class Treasurer 7, 8, Class Librarian 7, 8, Dancing Club 6, Music 
Club 4, Cheering Squad 1, 2, 3, Hebrew Club 2, Torch Typing 
Staff 1, 2, First .A.id Club 3, Office Squad 1, 2, 3. Yiddish Club 1, 
Dramatics 1, 2, 4. 

Class treasurer extraordinaire, her forte is collecting 
money from tight fisted 8th termers. Quiet and 
friendly Barbara will pursue her money-getting activ- 
ities at Brooklyn College. (And ever after, we hope I ) 

"There is a time oj speaking and a time of being still." 
— William Gaxton. 




SUSAN WEISER 

School Debating Team 5-8, Class Debating Team 5-8, Torch 
Business Manager 1-4, Business Manager of Elchanette 5-S, 
Dramatics Club 1-4, Music Club 5, 8, Math Club 6, Class 
Volleyball Team 5-8, Office Squad 3, First Aid Club 3, Cheering 
Squad 1, 2, 3, G. 0. Budget Committee 5-8, College Catalogue 
Chairman 6-8. 

Sue, a staunch supporter of the capitalist way of 
life, has defended her rights to her private property 
(a battered loose leaf and a sorely flat wallet) for 
three and a half years. Active in everything. Sue 
has won friends, influenced people and has accom- 
plished much. 

"Be to her virtues very kind 
Be to her faults a little blind." — Prior. 




Seventeen — 



Class of June 1952 




NAOMI WINTER 



School Debating Team 5-S, Class Debating Team ,i-5, Photog- 
raphy Club 1, Hobby Club 2, Journalism Club 3-6, Dramatiis 
1-5, Arista Member 5-S, Office Squad 2, 5, Assistant Editor oj 
Spark 5, Torch Reporter 1-5, English Editor of Elchanette 6-S. 

Sometimes known as Naomi, most of the time i^nown 
as Winnie, Naomi Winter has made her mark on 
our history classes by her disparaging remarks on 
the subject. As English Editor of the Elchanette, 
she has given the board many a hard time by her 
finicalness. 

"// winter comes, can spring be jar behind?"- 
Shelley. 



— Eighteen - 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 



We, the graduating classes of 1952, being of sound mind and body, do hereby 
bequeath all our valuable and precious possessions acquired during our years at 
Central to our most honorable, exalted and distinguished teachers. We hope that 
these legacies will help 'to perpetuate our memory in the halls of Central. 



LEGACIES 

To Dr. Saphire we leave a student body who will not contest rulings on 
examinations. 

To Dr. Lewin we leave a lifetime supply of O'Sullivan's Rubber Heels. 

To Mr. Friedman we leave full tuition to a school for soda-jerks. 

To Rozzi we leave an automatic average computer. "But Rozzie, my average 
is two points higher!" 

To Rabbi Herskovics we leave bigger and better packages for Israel. 

To Mr. Horn we leave a yearbook that will write and pay for itself. 

To Mr. Ravetch we leave scenery for all future plays. 

To Mr. Bassell we leave a class meeting that won't sound like the Snake Pit. 
Ladies! Be Seated! 

To Mr. linger we leave a society with a national income lower than combined 
savings and taxes. 

To Mrs. Jofen we leave a test so easy that we won't cheat. 

To Mr. Hoffman we leave a pencil to fix the blur on his "Shalon stencil." 

To Mrs. Schwartz we leave a Boro Park Young Israel that is more centrally 
located. 

To Madame Feur we leave a language with more regular than irregular verbs. 

To Rabbi Berenholtz we leave a collection of "Boy gets Girl" stories. 

To Mr. Annenberg we leave a "lassie, cocky but classy." 

To Mr. Wallach we leave a child of wonder and scorn. 

To Mr. Schur we leave all our 68 page notebooks — medium thick. 

To Dr. Lichtenstien we leave a class on Derech Eretz and in the art of becoming 
Yedidim. 

To the incoming Elchanette Board we leave all the debts of the outgoing 
Elchanette Board. 

To Central we leave 

Executor 

ISHA PESULA LE ADUS 



Nineteen — 




FRESHMAN 



■ Twenty — 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY 1952 

Entrance exam — we cut after exam . . . Excitement — new building — this is 
it! Bang! Boom! Clear the way — mass immigration of freshman class! Where? 
Here! Nine emaciated, skinny suckers start on a long trek — smallest class — biggest 
instigators . . . We sat down in Chumash — precedent for months later . . . Seruya 
main debator — "Quiet, it was the cat", cries Faivy — Seruya enters on all fours . . . 
New printing enterprise penetrates walls of Central — Hoffman, Hoffman and Hoff- 
man, Inc. Warehouse — C.H.Y., Wholesaler Hoffman, Retailer — Hoffman, Custom- 
ers — us. Commodity — Shalonim . . . Years roll by — enter Sherman-Lewin Anti- 
Trust act — end of monopoly . . . New faculty member said to be old and wise in 
the depth of the Hebrew language — years followed him — so did we — name is 
M. L. . . . What does French have to do with the Brooklyn Bridge, Mr. Fohr? Any- 
one who's not a complete idiot should know that answer . . . Supreme Court Justice 
Lewin declared unconstitutional thoughts of secession to New Utrecht, Jefferson. 
Erasmus — even T.A. considered . . . We learn how to figure with the new retired 
Hebrew teacher — teaches Math on the side . . . Pop came Rosenbloom, the Shmoo 
. . . Goldstein and Rabinowitz, Esquires advocate revolution — overthrow of the 
ignorant masses and extention of Mathematics . . , elementary Algebra added — 
we are now in M.e.s.s. I with the new eligible teacher, dr., lawyer, Indian chief — 
we learned Science . . . The papa and son dimples exhibit being shown in Room 5 — 
subject class — English . . . Final week — precedent continued — union of slave 
workers strike for shorter working hours, higher compensation . . . Federal and 
school troops restore order — force yellow dog contracts to be accepted . . . and so 
to rest again . . . 

DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE 1952 

Twenty-six belligerent girls enter 221 Kingston Ave. on a rainy Friday with 
spirits just as damp . . . Then on to room "6"! . . . Notice — 26 belligerent girls 
receive acceptance letters in the mail . . . Report on first day — also rainy — we 
receive first French lesson on linguistic record — "Lecon une, Knock! Knock! — 
Entrez!" . . . Progressive education can be fun!? . . . English class at 9:00 A.M., 
Mr. Ravetch — "There was an Ancient Mariner — hungry already Miss Marcus? — 
"he stoppeth one of three' — you're late get an admit — 'By thy long' — But Mr. 
Ravetch, the bus — 'long gray beard' — get out Miss ..."... Test with Lewin — 
please try O'Sullivan's heels! . . . When the Freshmen were in Hoffman's class — 
Let the Freshmen go. Oppressed so hard fhey could not stand three periods in a 
row! ! . . . Freshman politicians — Young and Katzoff run on one ticket . . . Mr. 
Lilker crosses Freshman in G.O. meeting — can only run for Sec'y — Katzoff wins 
by a landslide . . . Tommy the bus driver — M.A., Ph.D. — tutors Freshman in 
Civics while waiting for the light to turn green . . . Karalitzky rewrites old C.H.Y. 
song to the chagrin of Tchaikov.sky who is rumored to have turned over in his grave 
. . . Weiser becomes business manager — destined to last full 4 years. Rabbi Faivelson 
becomes Sue's chief publicity agent in Laws and Customs — Law — to bring ads, — 
Custom — to flunk if you don't . . . L'ag B'omer — Marcus, Schnall and Freshies 
walk away with all the honors . . . Tziril and Barbara disappear — they worked their 
fingers to the bone . . . "'Pheelis you arre eeting, I geeve you a zerro". '"But Mrs. 
Jofen, they're only cough drops." "Since when do cough drops have crumbs?" . . . 
Dr. Lewin speaks to Upper Freshman about new program — this term we will have 
M.e.s.s. I . . . New teacher comes to school — Perrie swoon — Girls go shopping 
for 64 page notebook — not 65? . . . Blossom has no qualms about finals — takes 
"em all . . . End of term — Winnie tops honor roll!! . . . Finals, Report Cards and 
three years to go. 



— Twenty-One ■ 








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SOPHOMORE 



Twenty-Two 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY 1952 

Never thought we'd stick it out — giving it another chance. — We have 
returned to the intellectual corner . . . Jewish History, Civics, Algebra, Ancient 
History — he sure is persistent — and ancient . . . Models wanted — "Toughie" 
Goldstein applies and is accepted provided he extends curriculum to music and gelt 
on the side . . . Mithtah Friedman, are you teaching Algebra? . . . Return to nor- 
malcy — we get the real dirt in Bio . . . Ambitious girls will receive five extra points 
for French scrapbooks — we are all ambitious — result — no French scrapbooks 
. . With condolences to Chusid, we divorce "Shimmy"! . . With a new addition 
to the faculty, we now have ten "Banot" . . . Tiens! Voila Bob!! — well la, die 
dah!! . . . Rumored — new Dr. roaming campus — patients waiting in prayer 
ward — finally arrives beard and all . . . Tic-Tak-Toe — taught exclusively in Bio 

— Hybrids dominate over pure . . . Nine French scholars excited over Regents — 
"Fine" — I always wanted to see your new building . . . Bio Regents — well, shall 
we go on — to our summer vacation? 

DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE 1952 

Twenty-four belligerent girls converge upon school for sophomore year . . . 
Mazel incurs wrath of the most high — starts off term with a bang — by tripping 
over victrola cord . . . Schnall put on trial for killing of class mascot Albert — Weiser 
presides — Schnall found guilty of premeditated murder — Sentence — pay for 
next mascot — also Shmoo by name of Alawishus . . . Sondra accepts position as 
part time ass't at Collenstein's Ice Cream Parlor — otherwise known as Edie's 
Candy Store — "just a little more whip cream — puleeze" . . . Shapiro wins 
marathon of 176 questions on Mishpatim Shalon — Time: IS minutes — no 
exemption this term, but receives great encouragement for next term . . . Art teacher 

— Mr. Goldstein, comes to school Bohemian style — by bicycle — confides to 
sophs that he will soon marry — Judy Kashtan passes approval on his fiancee . . . 
Dr. Lichtenstein enters with black briefcase and wishes to be our new Y'did . . . 
Morah Sara descends on Central and refuses to appreciate our red-head. Although 
spurned, Sondra, starving, returns on hands and knees . . . Mr. Schur beats Rebbetzin 
Jofen to the punch and we learn the facts of life in 4th term . . . Mrs. Schwartz 
tries to teach us Geometry — "But, Mrs. Schwartz, I can't draw a straight line 
with a ruler." "That's what I get for trying to teach blockheads squares and 
circles", answers Mrs. Schwartz . . . Mr. Friedman becomes administrator — among 
other duties becomes Mr. Anthony of Central ■; . . Mr. Horn walks in like a lamb, 
storms out of room like a lion — behavior of girls impossible . . . Mf. Lilker gives 
us Medieval History course — first half of period History — second half — personal 
tries to teach us Geometry — "But, Mrs. Schwartz, I can't draw a straight line 
girls first find out it wasn't necessary to start studying in November . . . Kashtan 
becomes first girl to cut regents! ! — Too bad! ! She has to take them next term . . . 
Finals, Regents and two years to go . . . 



— Twenty-Three — 





JUNIOR 



Twenty-Four — 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY 1952 



Nine peppy Juniors here — six went to Heaven, and three went down — to 
French. Tedious task of climbing steps to Paradise — first stop — Room 11 . . . 
We are now approaching our Geometry Regents — any questions foolish or otherwise, 
:Mr. Wallach? Soloweitchik (mit a wubbleyu) arrives and starts to mislead the 
class . . . 'Twas the sun that had an effect on Steon — effect ligers 'till P.T.A. meet- 
ing — for teachers only — men teachers don't mind . . . Rabinowitz escapes Steno 
room — we say she is more mature . . . We acted in the drama of life — Mr. Bassell 
— critic — typical of entire course . . . Pray, tell us what does Jeanette discuss with 
the History teacher evil lurks in corner discussions — eh, what? ... By hikher 
elementary mathematics and the miracle at 186th St. we are now in Intermediate 
Algebra — take out your gum, once and for all! ... French spies occupy Dr. Lewin's 
office — reported — three files missing — turn up in Room 208 — boss's headquarters 
. . . Class split on language issue — Tiens! Fitgam Hashavua on the Hebrew Regents! 
. . . and so to sleep again hoping we'll wake up as Seniors. 



•^S=^ 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE 1952 



Twenty-tow belligerent girls descend on school to begin their Junior year . . . 
New teacher by name of Shlush tells us he would rather teach in Central than become 
president of Israel — next term he changes his mind — he leaves! . . . 10th period 
Math in Room S — poor Mr. Wallach tries to teach us Geometry. "Parallel lines 
intersect everywhere. Any questions, foolish or otherwise? — Small voice in the 
back, "But, how can parallel lines intersect?" . . . Honesty campaign results in a 
two day penitence — then — "return to normalcy" . . . We run for every office — 
long live Joyce Friedman, Veep! . . . Lost elections made up for by victorious sing, 
volleyball tournament and L'ag B'omer outing . . . Influx of new students dispossesses 
Juniors — we move into Chapel — spiritual uplift in the morning is welcome? . . . 
Faige plans to upholster stone steps outside door . . . Shocking news in mid- December 
— we must take Intermediate Regents — just finished elementary algebra — What 
to do? Answer: Sunday morning. Saturday Nile dates deposit girls at Y.I. of B.P. 
. . . Finals, Regents and one year to go. 



Twenty-Five — 




SENIOR 



— Tuienty-Six — 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JANUARY 1952 

After a pleasant dream, we turn to a nightmare as Seniors . . . We learned that 
frustrated love can be sophisticated — Wednesday afternoon classes tell us other- 
wise . . . Graduation approaching — bribes needed — Klein brings two more carrots 
. . . Truce ends Lichty-Lilker struggle . . . Truth of last year's office visits comes 
out in Economics — huh, Chusid? . . . Dimples and cherry soda returns for fourth 
period — "The Return of the Native" . . . Abridged version of the Tanach taught 
in Room 10, Period 5 . . . Extended 50 minute periods introduced . . . The NEW 
Mar Hoffman reigns again — changed his tie — Shmita comes around — Shalonim 
return — what's the answer to No. 1,644? . . . Novick needs nine cans — brings 
one herself . . . Fame of Boro Park now secured — Hurray for Schechter's Poultry 
Case . . . While 4 alte kvetches stay in the park, a new tenant plays piano to amuse 
them . . . Regents come and go and so do we . . . BIG graduation arrives — we 
made it! ! ... We leave you with these famous words — WE SHALL RETURN! ! 



'^^==:^ 



DIARY OF CLASS OF JUNE 1952 

Twenty-two belligerent girls finally make it — we are now SENIORS . . . We 
descend upon brand new building, but alas! — we're caged up in the last room on 
the third floor . . . New juice machines keep girls on diets, but stiff competition 
arises from candy machine in the next room — things get worse as we move into 
same room as candy machine! . . . Bayle becomes new interpreter of "Roberts Rules 
of Parlaimentary Procedure" — meetings still sound like "Snake Pit" — "I demand 
a vote on the revote" — "It that legal?" . . . Susan threatens to marry a teacher — 
Mr. Lilker considers change of profession . . . Mr. Ravetch's wife puts him on a 
diet — girls starve! . . . New subject — "Ungarian Theory of Economics" — certain 
girls refuse to accept it because it "never gets across". . . Girls get their proofs back — 
"The photographer just didn't take a liking to me". . . Central institutes a Tzedaka 
drive — girls groan — Barbara collects! . . . "Where's Mr. Hoffman?" — "He was last 
seen dragging chairs from one room to another" . . . First flood of term in "poor taste" 
results in arbitration . . . Hoffman and Berenholtz decide to keep all Hebrew Diplomas 
for themselves . . . Girls advance to "most honorable, exalted, exclusive, and dis- 
tinguished position as a result of Senior Day. Conservative costumes (dungarees, 
daddy shirts — tails out — pink bows and all day suckers) made VOGUE. Tear- 
jerker floods us to second Sing victory — Faigy, Winnie, and Sue do it again . . . 
Elchanette board announces sudden demise of yearbook — printer goes out of 
business. Celia revives seniors' hopes . . . Elchanette board announces sudden demise 
of Celia's printer — Mazel revives seniors' hopes . . . Finals, regents, and at last 
we're here!? 



— Ttoenty-Seven — 



ECHOES OF THE PAST 

In the year 2203 there was found in archaeological diggings near the village of 
Slobudka, in the middle of no-where, an odd-looking capsule. On close examination, 
this capsule proved to be a reel of microfilm. It took these men who found this reel 
of film many, many years to find their way back to civilization. And so today, 20 
years later, in the year 2223, the microfilm will have its premiere. 



Lights 




. , , Camera . . . Action!!!]] 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS ON THE BUS 

The climax of Miss Cyrella Chavei's centennial is the 
completion of her novel which was started in the course 
of her tedious and lone travels to and from school. This 
commuting has prepared her for a career of globetrotting, 
which inspired this novel and which Miss Chavel hopes 
will inspire future novels. 

TRIAL EXTRAORDINAIBE 

Miss Ann Horowitz, celebrated criminal lawyer (office 
on soap box in Central Park- MaH) wHl justify the suc- 
cessful murder of a "shealon". The "shealon" was cut 
through question fifty-six. Miss Horowitz will prove that 
the girl was not a communist, pink, or fellow traveler. 
Hordes of this school's alumni will be present to give 
Miss Horowitz much needed moral support. 

DICED HISTORY 

Dr. Naomi Ann Winter, noted Professor of Social 
Sciences at Yeshiva College for Women, today published 
her new theory on the science of eating carrots in class. 
This paper is a direct repudiation of the theory set forth 
by Mr. Lilker — Professor of History at Central High. 
When asked by the press to make a statement regarding 
Dr. Winter's theory', he replied, "No Comment". 

BON VOYAGE 

Mazel Tov!! P'nina has finally made it! After years 
of long and patient toil Miss P'nina Karalitzky finally 
finished knitting the gray sweater begun in her Central 
days. In an interview granted to us yesterday she in- 
formed us that she is leaving on the next boat to Israel. 
She is taking the sweater with her. 

TAM TOV TAKES ON A NEW TAM 

Good news for the housewives! Today, the cheese mag- 
nate, Esther Schnall, announced the discovery of a new 
and better tasting cheese. She hailed it as a great step 
forward in the ancient art of cheesemaking. Since this 
new cheese surpasses the former best seller Tarn Tov, it 
will be known as "Tarn Tov M'od". 



y 




■ Twenty-Eight — 



FINAL PAYMENT MADE 



y 




Miss Susan Weiser, Asst. Secretary of the U.S. Treas- 
ury, revealed today that in her high school days she was 
business manager of the Central Yeshiva High School 
for Girls graduating journal. She accepted this position 
in a moment of wild abandon, and has been paying ( lit- 
erally) for it ever since. 

However, yesterday, in a historic meeting with the 
now greying printer, Miss Weiser made the final pay- 
ment. Letters were sent to all living alumni requesting 
them to come or send for their copies of the 
ELCHANETTE. 

NEW SCHOOL OPENS 

The New York State Board of Education today an- 
nounced the chartering of a new progressive school. Miss 
Joyce Friedman, headmistress, outlined for us in a special 
interview the school's program. Its most progressive feat- 
ures are no tests, no homework, small classes, and in- 
formal companionship between students and teachers. 
The idea for this school germinated during the time of 
Miss Friedman's high school days which were spent in 
C.Y.H.S. Her experiences in Central convinced her that 
tests and homework are not the best methods of impart- 
ing knowledge. 

POSTMISTRESS GENERAL 
APPOINTED 

The Senate of Bali-Hi today approved the appointment 
of Miss Hadassah Judy Kashtan as Postmistress General. 
This was a token of appreciation for her patronage of 
postage stamps. In her acceptance speech, Miss Kashtan 
outlined her plan for reduced rates for all Bail-Hi students 
who correspond with the outside world. 

BARUCH HABA 

A "new" ambassador has arrived from Israel. She is 

Miss Tziv Lewko, a conscientious, ardent worker dedi- 
cated to reforming all the "T'nuot" in America. Many 
years ago it was her ambition to be sent on a "Machon". 
Due to a lack of funds (among other things) her stay in 
the U.S. was prolonged. After finally reaching "Aretz" 
she is now returning to fulfill her obligations. We wish 
her the best of luck in this venture. 

CATASTROPHE IN PRINTING — 
PRINTERS STARVING 

President of the printing monopoly, John L. Maze!, 
startled the public with her. revealing testimony in front 
of a Congressional Investigating Committee. She at- 
tributed the failure of the printing industry to the machi- 
nations of Senior Classes and their failure to pay. It has 
finally resulted in a general physical and mental break- 
down of printers. As a remedy John L. Mazel suggested 
the financing of all yearbooks by the government. 



r 



^! 




— Twenty-Nine ■ 



NEW SCHOOL OF ART STARTED 
BY MODERN YOUNG PAINTER 

Miss Nahama D. Deutsch shocked the world by de- 
veloping a new method of expression in art. In her latest 
exhibition of masterpieces at the Museum of Modern 
Art, Miss Deutsch exhibited her unusual talents in por- 
traying what the critics call "unnatural realism". When 
asked to what she attributed her success, she modestly 
replied, "..... ." 

NEW ILLUSTRATED COPY OF 
SHALONIM ON SALE 

Realizing the problems that all students have in 
reading and understanding the Shalonim, Miss Phyllis 
Hausman undertook the printing of a new seven million 
page volume containing all the Shalonim, their explana- 
tions and answers. This book is cleverly illustrated in 
ten colors corresponding to our famous ten plagues. 

S H O CKl!! 

The former Miss Schonfeld has shocked the world by 
presenting her husband with an army of sixtuplets. This 
created quite a problem among the manufacturers of baby 
furniture and clothes. The mother of the sixtuplets 
finally decided to use the products of the .... company 
which include a reversible double decker combination 
bed, high chair and carriage. 



A DEGREE IS AWARDED 

Miss E. Rabin has finally received her degree in 
psychiatry. Miss Rabin believes in the common proverb, 
"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." Miss Rabin 
took longer than usual to find a subject worthy of her 
observation. She finally found Miss Nagel who had tried 
time and time again to act in tragic role, but never 
succeeded. Miss Rabin set out to prove that with psychfl- 
logical help Miss Nagel could overcome this difficulty. 
After tedious months of hard work on the part of both, 
Miss Nagel received a starring role in Macbeth. This 
huge success has once again proven to the world that "If 
at first you don't succeed try, try again." 



IMPROVEMENT AT U.N. 

For many years there has been a shortage of inter- 
preters at the U.N. This problem has been overcome with 
the appearance of Miss Sivia Hauptman at the last 
session. Miss Hauptman has shown her prowess by in- 
terpreting communism. Her interpretation is (esp)ecially 
during tests) : "One for all and all for one." 



Thirty — 



MARCUS and CHESIR HIT MET 

In her first appearance at the New York Metropolitan 
Opera House, Miss Marcus was breathtaking in a daring 
blue gown (conforming to Central's standards, of course). 
Rising to her full stature, the lovely virtuoso opened 
her mouth and the beautiful pear-shaped tones of "Ah 
Like It" flowed forth. At the end of her performance 
the audience, to a man, stood up and cheered for a full 
half hour. The women left. 

Accompanying Miss Marcus on the piano was our 
talented pianist. Miss Bayle Chesir. Owing to the fact 
that all the keys of the piano were present and accounted 
for, the supreme grandeur of the selection was ap- 
preciated. 

SCIENTISTS STUMPED, 
SOMETHING FISHY 

Miss Barbara Shapiro, tuna connoisseur of five con- 
tinents, has exhausted the supply. Creating a tuna drink, 
she has downed copious amounts of sandwiches. Miss 
Shapiro is now on tour fighting for the cause of synthetic 
tuna. Meanwhile, she has turned to cod. 

TZffilL INTERPRETS 
'TALES OF HOFFMAN" 

The prima ballerina, Moira Bernstein, is featured 
presently at the Globe theatre in her own interpretation 
of the "Tales of Hoffman". She has revolutionized the 
dance world with her latest step "The Stamp of the 
Hoof." In her performance she brings out the finer points 
in her dance routine. 

A LOT OF DOUGH 

Miss Sarah R. Berlin has won her tenth consecutive 
rise (by using yeast) to heights while introducing her 
technicolor cake decorator . . . ! ! This cake was dedi- 
cated to her alma mater portraying "The Best Wasted 
Years of Her Life"!! 

"REFORM OF THE SONNET" 

New Poetess Laureate of the United States of Central, 
Miss Vivian Blachor, standardizes the sonnet to thirteen 
and a half lines and uses the beat of piambic centameter. 
The "Shmulitzer" prize was awarded to this acomplished 
poetess. 



7- 



,^ 



H 



Thirty-One — 



In Retrospect 

They have just begun to know you 
And already they must part, 
With a tear on every eyelash 
And a pang in every heart. 

Though they bear a happy countenance, 
And march so proudly up the stage, 
In each mind appears fond memories 
And the future's bright new page. 

We look at them and then we say: 
•'How much of precious time was cost 
In years just wasted never thinking 
Of hours now forever lost." 

In years at school yet to come. 
We can aspire to learn and gain. 
And still there's time to try to strive 
For goals we hope to still attain. 



Helene Gaktenberg 



— Thirty-Two 




ChdivIiiM, 



— Thirty-Three 




THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION 

In its short period of existance, the G. O. has made great strides in the field of 
extra-curricular activities. It has just completed a very successful year under the 
guidance of Miss Iris Cohen, our faculty advisor. The G.O. has organized many 
activities which are now functioning independently. These are: Debating Team, 
Arista, Publications, Athletics, Service Squad, and Employment Bureau. 

In our luncheonette, the G.O. has opened up a "co-op" store, selling such things 
as school pins, book covers, sweatchirts, review books and all necessary school 
supplies. 

Our yearly Chanukah affairs, Purim Carnivals and L'ag B'Omer outings are 
sponsored by the G.O. This year another successful activity has been added. The 
Dramatic Club put on a successful production of "The Mikado." 

The officers for the past year were: Jeanette Klien, President September 1951 — 
February 1952, Eileen Rabin, PresidentFebruary — June 1952, Joyce Friedman, Vice 
President, Tova Ordentlich, Secretary, Ruth Freeman, Treasurer. 



— Thirty-Four — 



THE ARISTA 

Arista is composed of students who are outstanding in character, service, and 
scholarship. It is made up of an Assembly of student members and a Senate of 
teacher members. 

The activities of Arista consist of the admittance of new members, the coaching 
squad, assistance to the faculty by proctoring entrance exams, the approval of all 
candidates running for G.O. offices, and maintaining order during assemblies. Arista 
has attended a performance of the opera, Manon, and spent an evening at the ballet. 

Mr. Martin Lilker has been the faculty adviser of Arista. During the fall 
term the officers were Hadassa Lichtenstein, Leader, and Sarah R. Berlin, Vice- 
Leader. The officers for the spring term were Sarah R. Berlin, Leader, and Susan 
Friedman, Vice-Leader. 




— Thirty-Five 



PUBLICATIONS — LITERARY BOARD 

For the second year in a row the senior class has taken upon itself the publica- 
tion of a yearbook. As in the past, the senior class has borne full responsibility and 
it follows that the yearbook is predominantly senior. 

In "The Elchanette" is recorded the history of the graduating class from its 
entrance to its graduation. But in the literary sections, both Hebrew and English, 
may be found the work of the undergraduates. This acts both as an encouragement 
to girls with writing ability and as an outlet for their literary efforts. 

The Publications Board consists of one member from each of the freshman and 
sophomore classes. From each Junior class there are two representatives. Mr. David 
M. Horn serves as our capable faculty advisor. The editors of this yearbook are 
Cyrella Chavel, Editor-in-Chief, Eileen Rabin, Hebrew Editor, Naomi Winter, English 
Editor, Nechama Deutsch, Art Editor. 




— Thirty-Six ■ 




PUBLICATIONS — BUSINESS BOARD 

As in the past year, Central publications has undertaken to finance our yearbook. 
This group consists of one representative from each class elected to serve for a period 
of one year. Each representative is responsible to the business manager to see that 
her class fills its quota of money. 

Central Publications takes great pride in the fact that it has successfully reached 
its quota for this year. This could not have been accomplished without the coopera- 
tion of each and every student. Publications appreciates this cooperation and on 
behalf of the Senior Class wishes to express its gratitude to the whole student body. 

This year, Susan Weiser has again served as business manager. She has been 
ably assisted by Phyllis Hausman. Mr. David M. Horn served as faculty advisor. 



■ Thirty-Seven ■ 




DEBATING SOCIETY 

The Debating Society has made great strides in the last year in arousing the 
interest of the girls in the art of public speaking. It has sponsored a series of inter- 
class debates which has done much to awaken this interest. Among the topics of 
debate were: 

Resolved: Sex Education should be taught in the High School. 

Resolved: Exemption should be given. 

The accomplishments of the Debating Society are due to the capable leadership 
of its manager, Sheila R. Lifschitz. 



Thirty-Eight 



THE SPARK 

The Journalism Club led by Mr. Bassell has just completed its second year of 
sponsoring "The Spark." "The Spark" is the monthly publication of the students 
of Central. 

This publication includes both a Hebrew and an English section and is a recorder 
of important school events. It features also editorials, school news, reviews, student 
polls and interviews. 

The Editorial Staff is based on a monthly rotation system, thus enabling more 
girls to gain experience in journalism. A system has also been devised, whereby the 
Assistant Editor becomes Editor-in-Chief for the forthcoming issue. 

The last issue this term was printed in photo-offset. This has been a great step 
in the expansion of Central Publications. The editors for the year were: Susan 
Friedman, Rozy Newman, Helen Mintz, Tova Ordentlich and Yona Loriner. 




Thirty-Nine — 



THE SERVICE SQUAD 

This February when we moved to our new building the Service Squad was faced 
with many new problems. These problems have been met and successfully solved. 
Our building is now a model of cleanliness and decorum. 

The head of the Service Squad is Debbie Riback. There are two representatives 
from each class to assist her in her duties. 



success 



This is just another instance where a G.O. sponsored Squad has proven a great 

ess. 




Forty — 




BASKETBALL 

This year the basketball team got off to a fine start. After choosing the fourteen 
girl team, they began to practice every Tuesday night under the able coaching of 
Stanley Jaffe and William Kotkes. Although the will to play many schools was there, 
the games could not be arranged. The season therefore consisted of two games against 
Ramaz — wirming the first one but losing the second. This season is finished but we 
can look forward to a much better and fuller season. 



Forty-One ■ 



djuJtDqhaphA. 






-^ Forty-Tico — 




<£iJbiA£dWUL 



Forty-Three — 



THE ETERNAL FLAME 

It was a cold winter night in the little town of Tarter. Yosel had just returned 
from "shul" with his little son Moshe, and as he entered his house, he forgot about 
the cold. The Sabbath candles lit the house with a holy light, and warmed not only 
the room but the hearts of the people within it. 

"Good Shabbos everybody." 

"Good Shabbos, my husband," said Rachel. Rachel was a short woman with a 
kind face. She loved her husband and was very pioud of him. 

"How is the baby, Rachel?" 

"Oh, the baby is fine. He learned to say Good Shabbos today. Come on darling, 
say Good Shabbos to pappa." 

From the corner a muffled "Good Shabbos" was heard. The sound came from a 
cheerful looking baby in a crib. He gurgled with happiness, and all the Shabbos joy 
seemed to be reflected in his face. 

As the family sat down at the table to eat, Moshe said to his father, "Pappa, I 
heard something that frightened me today. Avrom, the miller's son, said that the 
Nazis are nearing our town. He and his father are going to run away tonight." 

"Never fear my son. Our lives are in the hands of G-d, and He will see that 
we are judged righteously. No harm will befall us that is not supposed to." 

Suddenly, Moshe jumped up from the table. "I hear something Pappa! It 
sounds like marching in the distance." 

"I hear it too!" screamed Rachel. Yosel moved quickly but calmly. 

"The baby! Whatever happens to us we must save the baby," said Yossel. He 
really didn't know what he was doing; he Only knew that he must save his child, 
and this knowledge became more intense as the marching soldiers neared. 

In the corner stood a box about three feet long. Yosel quickly wrapped the baby 
in a blanket and put it into the box. 

"But if he should cry," said Rachel nervously. 

"We can only pray that he doesn't." 

The marching came nearer and nearer. The three members of the family were 
huddled together in the corner of the room, awaiting their fate. Panic was upon thir 
faces, but if one looked closely, hope and prayer might also be seen. 

Suddenly, the door was kicked open. A German commander was standing in the 
doorway. A mean, cold look was in his eyes. 

"Get out into the street you fafluchter Yude!" 

The little family ran out, nervously looking at the box, not caring about their 
own fate, but praying that the baby would not cry out. 

The door banged shut as if from itself, and outside a piercing scream was heard. 
Three shots followed it. When the Americans came the next 4ay, they found a 
deathlike silence reigning over the house. One of the Shabbos candles was still burn- 
ing, and a muffled cry came from the box in the corner. 

And the Jewish nation will live forever! 
Let them kill us! Let them burn us! 
Let them think that they are victors! 
But the Eternal Flame will never die! 
And the Jewish nation will live forever! 

— Naomi Roitman 



Forty-Six ■ 



THE BLIND MAN 

He walks the streets, for he is blind, 
And begs you for a penny. 
A decent job he can not find, 
Not two eyes has he, not any. 

You sympathize and drop a dime 
Into his outstretched hands. 
Money you have, but not the time 
To give him the joy he demands. 

He nods his head in thankfulness, 
As he hears the money clink. 
You walk away in forgetfulness. 
And of him you no longer think. 



-Lillian Claire Solomon 



"All the days of thy vanity for this is thy portion 
in this life." 

— ECCLESIATES IX - 9 

Eternally damned to wander alone 
With loneliness aching in every bone. 
Heartsick of crying to grey dreary skies 
While hope for sunshine gets weaker and dies. 

Yet wandering alone is not half as bad 

As smiling alone. A sight so sad 

That tears again flow. But I'm used to them, 

For joys, I don't think, from my heart can stem. 

Again and again, that word I cry out. 
Like a funeral bell, "Alone!" I shout, 
"Alone! Alone!" echoes in my ears. 
Oh, for an end to life's pitious tears. 

"Alone! Alone!" The words crowd in on me 
They block out my vision. Now I can't see! 
They beat my head, weigh me down to the ground. 
Then all is silent . . . No words . . . Not a sound. 

— Vivian Blachob 



— Forty-Seven — 



Scene I (Soliloquy) 

MAN: On one drab gloomy day 
I chanced and saw my life. 
T'was wrapped up in years past, 
Ready to be thrown away. 

The past bore joy and sorrow, 
The present brings what it may. 
The future darkens my sight. 
It reveals not what is for the morrow. 

I breathe now my last breath, 
'Tis soon I enter what I may. 
Farewell to the cruel mean world 
And into the new life in DEATH! 

{He then stabs himself) 

Scene II 

(With scorn and jun making) 
ANGEL: Welcome to our very own world 
You came here the fool's way! 
Why sponsor your own death 
When you were to die the very next day? 

MAN: You say I entered this realm the fool's way? 

That my death was planned the very next day? 

Fear not! In my heart there is no sorrow. 

So what, if from my life one day I did borrow. 

ANGEL: You heed not the law of G-d. 

Have you no belief in the Creator of man? 
Just wait! for your destiny is near. 
Soon you will begin your new life span. 

MAN: You seem to speak in warning tone. 
Realize you not how glad am I? 
To begin life anew was my cause. 
Therefore I was so anxious to die. 

(Enter Messenger) 

MESSENGER: From the court of destiny I have 
brought to thee 

The future, which darkened your 
eyes so. 

You are happy now that your future 
is present. 

But alas! how better off you were when 
you did not know. 



Forty-Eight 



MAN: Stall ye not in delivering your message. 
You were not sent to criticize my ways. 
All of you laugh and scorn my very doings. 
Speak^my future now, so know it well I may. 

MESSENGER; To welcome those who sponsor their 
own deaths. 

To show them the wrong which they 
conWiittW/ -'• " 

To tead^ihepa to their own destinies 
: To'liyesfofieverjvilh the truth you have 
.admitte^,,,j£5 ,^iH .■■ -I . ..,.;.; i 

For taking one's life into one's own 
handS! :; -i-vi -i^i TiSi^ .^:'n;i^/ 
Is against tjits^d^cjeepf; [the Holy 
Scripture. ,, . 

To the one who disobeys this sacred 

law, 

Is given a dark and dismal future. 

Scene III (Soliloquy) 

MAN: The day is drab and gloomy, 

My mind is twisted and contorted. 

But the morrow may be bright and sunny, 

And my thoughts be orderly sorted. 

The life which I forfeited 
Is so far from my grasp. 
The life which I desired 
Proves to be an everlasting task. 



— Forty-Nine ■ 



AN UNIMPORTANT EPISODE 

Joseph Reiss is an ordinary American. He has a wife, two children and a job 
in the nearby city. He owns his own home in town and commutes to the city five 
days a week. He goes by train, but he has a 1939 coupie for weekends. The census 
would have classified him as a perfect example of the average American with one 
exception. In A*^ .erica the average man is Protestant and Joseph Reiss is Jewish. 
But he is a passive Jew. His friends are Jewish — but they have a tie of nationality ■ — 
not religion. He belongs to the Jewish Athletic Club. He plays poker every Tuesday 
night at the clubroom of the B'nai Brith — but he counts a number of non-Jews among 
his friends. 

Ralph T. Sennet is an ordinary American on all counts. He is a non-Jew. A 
little lower on the social scale than Joseph Reiss. he doesn't commute but has a small 
business in town. He is an ardent Protestant. His life revolves around the church, 
but he is quite tolerant of Jews-. His- daughter plays with the- little Reiss girl. 

Now for the platitudes. Here we see a picture of Jew and non-Jew, living to- 
gether, working together, allowing their children to grow up together. A happy view, 
encouraging view. But 

One morning John Sennet, Ralph's son, on his way to the local high school from 
which he will graduate this year, passed the synagogue. That same morning Joseph 
Reiss went to the synagogue to pay his membership dues. 

There was a large stone on the sidewalk along the synagogue. John wanted to 
see what a good shot he was. He picked up the stone and was ready to throw it over 
the synagogue. Joe Reiss apjjeared, and horrified at the sight of John jMjised to throw 
the rock, shook him soundly. John was shocked. He pushed Joe who fell and hit his 
head. John ran. The rest was a nightmare. 

The sleepy town woke up and armed itself into two camps. Jews stood by Joseph, 
non-Jews by Ralpih. After a few days the facts were explained and everyone was 
shame-faced and sorry. Reiss made a formal apology and everything was fine. 

But somehow, Joe Reiss and Ralph Sennet sort of avoid each other. Too bad, for 
they both are such nice fellows. 

— Ann Horowitz 



— Fijiy 



'TWO GIRLS WHO FLUNKED 
A MATH TEST" 

It was the first recitation after the test. Two girls came 
into the math class. One was tall and slender, with black 
hair and dark brown eyes. She was carefully dressed, 
almost as if to indicate that her mind was so free from 
care that she could be painstaking about her appearance. 
She chattered gaily with her unresponsive companion and 
greeted her friends with carefree remarks. 

"What difference does one math test more or less 
make?' was her laughing comment on her failure. "How 
could I have studied math when I was at a perfectly ter- 
rific party that night? Now I suppose I'll have to cram 
for the regents." 

With these words she went to the nearest mirror and 
fluffed out her short hair with vigorous passes of her 
comb. Then turning to her companion she said, 

"Cheer up, old girl, this isn't the end of the world." 

Her friend, however, still kept a gloomy look on her 
face. Her eyes had the hurt expression of a wounded 
creature ; her head was bent forward to her chest and her 
shoulders drooped slightly. Her general appearance was 
one of dejection mingled with shame. She seemed to slink 
behind her taller companion, in order to avoid the glances 
and comments of the other girls. When she finally reached 
her seat, she sat down quickly, opened her book, and 
began to study. 

— Bayle Chesir 



— Fi/ly-One — 



"ON THE BUS" 

It was almost dark. I was riding home from school, my looseleaf 
crammed with notes and school work and outlines of future assignments 
resting on my lap. 

In the center of a near-slum area, under an elevated railroad, the 
bus stopped for a red light. There is a gas station there on the corner; 
the street is unpaved in spots and the surrounding area is grey and bleak. 
That is where I saw them. 

She could have been the laughing teenager I had seen Sunday. 
Her hair was blond, and a mother's pampering hands could have made 
it shiny and smooth. Her pinched, sharpened features could have been 
kissed into a pretty smile, had she been cared for. A tasteful, plain skirt 
and a freshly ironed blouse could have wrapped her in the charm of a 
well-adjusted high school girl. But she wore a shapeless coat, which 
would have had a flared back, if there had been enough material, and 
the split ends of her hair pointed in all directions as a result of an ill- 
fated attempt at curling them. The open-toed, sling-heeled shoes on 
her feet and a cigarette dangling from Tier fingers told of the remain- 
ing shreds of sell-respect left to her — her desire to hold her head 
higher than the ne.xt person, for whatever reason she could muster. 

And when you looked at the boy, the same story screamed out at 
you. His stance spoke of an effort to assume that indifferent self- 
assured look. I saw there the boy that could have been. His sunken 
chin could have been raised in boyish arrogance: his drooping jacket 
could have been carelessiy opened to let the wind blow on a full, well- 
fed chest. He could have been manfully tall and broad. But he was 
thin and bent and stunted in body and in spirit. 

There they stood; he with the shopping bag in hand, somehow 
managing to look protecting, she with her eyes darting in all directions, 
like the mad dartings of an insect looking for escape, and then return- 
ing to him questioningly. 

The bus started to move and they were out of my sight. People, 
coming home from a day's work, streamed past my window; yet pierc- 
ing through the throbbing stream I saw those darting eyes, always ask- 
ing, "Where shall we go?" They were trying to flee; where should they 
run? From what were they running? They would leave behind them 
parents who could feed and clothe them well — if they had the money, 
and love them — if they had the time. They would run into the black, 
empty heart of a city which has no heart because it is black and empty. 

_ — ''In the mouths of children, growing children, are the foundations 

of your strength," and what strength have you established in these?" — 

— 'Vivian Blachor 



— Fifty-Ttvo — 



THE VILLAGE OF PEACE 

One of my most exciting experiences as an explorer was during an expedition to 
Ganney Mountains on the second day of the expedition. I left my companions and 
set out in a canoe to photograph the surrounding country. It was a peaceful day; the 
scenery was breathtaking. Lazily, I stretched out in the canoe and closed my eyes. 

I was awakened by a sudden jolt and found that my boat had drifted onto the 
bank of a river. I climbed out of the canoe with my camera, and gun in hand. I 
began to walk inland. Farther and farther inland I walked until I was miles from 
the river. Suddenly, I grew panicky for I realized I was alone without food. My 
eyes grew heavy; I slumf)ed to the ground completely exhausted. 

Dawn was breaking when I awoke. There was an empty feeling in my stomach, 
my mouth was parched, but still I walked on. Suddenly, in the distance I spied a 
great wall with a gate looming high above me. As I neared it I noticed a kindly 
looking gentleman wearing a white robe. Apparently he was the gatekeeper. I 
motioned for him to open the gate. Surely he would not refuse a thirsty and hungry 
stranger. Immediately, he gave me water and ushered me into the city. To my 
astonishment a beautiful and ancient city appeared before me. The houses were one 
story affairs supported by tall pillars of marble. The villagers stopped their work 
and gathered around to stare at my gun, my dress and my camera. 

I was wondering what I cou'd do to impress the peop'e and gain their friendship 
when T noticed a bird flyinq above. With my gun, I aimed at the bird, pulled the 
trigger and shot it down. The people backed away and started to shout with fear. 
They stared at the dead bird with amazement th^n at me with scorn. A man who 
appeared to be the chief of the village approached and motioned for me to leave. I 
started to p'ead with him in my native ton^'-e and to my surprise he understood. I 
told him I was hungry and very tired, for I had traveled a great distance. Finally, he 
consented to let me stay. He gave me a room to sleep in and ordered his daughter to 
bring me some food. I had never before tasted more delicious food, nor had I seen 
such a beautiful girl as the chief's daughter. I was curious to know why the people 
had acted so strangely when I shot down the bird, so I asked the girl. She told me 
that her people had never known strife or cruelty, for in this village brotherly love 
reigned supreme. 

Every night the chief would invite me to his chambers and beg me to tell him 
of the outside world. I told him of all the modern conveiences, the wonderous in- 
ventions and the bloody wars. He listened with astonishment. My story was soon 
spread throughout the village. 

As the days passed I showed the people how to improve their surroundings and 
modernize their way of living. Many of the people were against my plan. They did 
not want their society to be changed. Soon the village was divided into two groups, 
one opposed to the modern conveniences and the other for it. For the first time in 
the history of the village the people argued and fought among themselves. 

What had I done to this village of brotherly love? Had I destroyed their peace? 
This plagued my conscience until I decided to leave, for I knew once I left everything 
would return to normal. 

The next day, I reluctantly bid farewell to the people and proceeded on my way. 
I hoped luck was with me so that I would be able to find my way back to the canoe. 
I resolved never to divulge the location of the village to anyone so that the peace of 
its people would never again be disturbed by outsiders. 

— Evelyn Rudoff 



Fifty-Three ■ 



s 

"I 



n 
1 



— Fijiy-four 



ns^ n^np 



HE'D^ "iDOJ nr ."'i:t ijst nriN .n3«'7D ^3 ntryn n't i-'p^w 'n'? nac lynts'n 

.^i^D nn iaj;D3 'no 

,c"it5'Dr ""ic 'n'7"'33D S2 '73n .^inn •'D"' ntrtr ^3 '7c mtann «\-i nac'n 
Ki nac'n era «an cnipn -"d nmn^ ,njtyD nn^i nni ">it? ,n'7D canry "•jc 
na:nDn ry^,, lao c^s^nnc nnc ^c' tripn mNO mjn^ T'« n'^yirn '73 .yas'a 
nnffi'jn n« c'-'inn'? ^13"' ,n3cn ncnp n« n3iTn m«n pn ."pois irt^u nnj3i 

.ni nrn mn\T 

,a'7n 1D3 : ^t?D^ .yiac'n "•d"' '73^ nrnn n3E'n: uonty mpan «in nsc cV"* 
mn3S' en cv '733 imK ^^3T'7 cs^s i:« ;3'7i .cnssn ^3'? c^n kxt> uoatr 

.'131 nsB^s "'ity ,n3B''7 ]itrKT — p33 nacn cc '7y 

«^« :i3^3 n3«'7D '71031 .cjun nni:D3 niisx n:i''N rt3cn '?u nn'i'na 
cnscn .(T'l .N'"? niDB') "w^in c>np •'3 nstrn n« cmnd,, .caa cim cnpa 
nine cTiiity vm '7inn "'c '7c n3N'7Qn i33 ""Jsid nncn cr -i3t:i yiu n'^n 
">3 ,nn3tyj nntyn nv nrr'Sty ]3'7i ,'7n: n3 B'jy n3K'7Da j-in rB'3y ^3k ,n3C3 
no •'3 ,ni3TnB' — "w\p'? n^un cr ns ni3t„ laK 73^1 .insc^'' o"'o^^ '733 
n«i33 ^33 n3 piDy'7 n3«^D -p rav •'jso n^i incnp ■•jsd «in ,13 sis'hb' 
.ncnpn piD3 nsiyn hk nism nsc'n '7i'7n '7yi '7K^B'"' ■'ys's ^y .i«3: c"'«"'3:nsr 
"nsE'n DV nK cnc'ipi,, norn (t""') in>DT' ."1313d 'n cnp nD«„ (n"j) n-y^i 
."itrip Tiinsty nHi„ ,"ccnpa 'n ""js •'3 nyn'7„ ''IQ133 trnntyn (3) 'i'MprnM 

c:i '7«itr'' nT'n3'7 nmip n3trn .ikd nonp ^t^'^p ^?^^ n3cn nynp 
iTiiixDa udp icK,, nsc ^B* cnps Di^'^nnn p^ ,min inn c^1p '7«^B'"•7 n:na 
.3112 ci"'3 cnciHtr 1D3 "cy '73D 1:3 nn3 nty«„ «'7i /'itrip 03^1 1:3 nxm 
"tsnp ■>«"ipD n'7nn cr,, .nniN nyspi' ccip trip nzun an nn'.ry minm 
T-nn r\2vr] ci'-c ,nmi nirsc i'73 '7y n'i'iyi .nnyinn n"irns3 jitrsn nDi'73 
.ns DinxB' ,n3B'3 nnis3n uv '?n D«-pin ,Dys Dity3 nn« nr^ nma ij"'«i 10113 

onsit 'i''n nmnin '73 i'? : nn« '7''Tn .ind ny i3'''7y n3"'3n r\2un nts'np 
3np3 N3 in ]3 nits'D iTn tn nsa'n nr hk D^tyipD d'713 .wip'? nsc^n Dr n« 
nmip p«3 ,^np ny'7 ,ts'ip nst? may nnnn'? ntyo n3B'n ncnp cni .ijid^s 

.mm inD3 ~ cip3 ijiai ns 'n mn^i tynpi i'7i« 



Fifty-Five ■ 



58it?^5 i^Dn i: nnnn 



nmnn ■«mt .'7snB''''7 nanji n"Dpn^ i'? n-^n men -"^d moK irosn 
HDU uny nmps 'rDnoj c« ."uityn '7K Tnin en'? "rinj aita np^ 'i'3„ : lowtr 

Dn''3 DJT mpD'7 ciK f^B' Dn"'a D3 .D^nn pi ns Dno'i'Dn CQSs'Dm wpun 
,1103 nyn'7 n3n«i ,15^3^ '7D31 las'? '73a T'p'rs 'n n« nnnsi,, .nan^ m«n 

.'7'733 D'i'iym ,'r«nB'i "n nmo"' on un'? nonsi 
n'i'N ".in-'oy lastrn pnx3 ,'7W3d jnn n't my "JS^ ,i'' "'"''"i"' pi^ 'i'pB'Di pix ''J3« 
cs'i'K ■'is'? .minn '733 'JKisr-' n« nn'-nnc' N-in «''n ncnpn minn 
— '7«its''' cy n« T'Dcn'Ji i3k^ iB'p3 — 1JX1N3 myis csmnn yns3 n:\ff 
^sntyity c"'3''iNn mKn3 .ni3"'3 ns'iB'M no"" ni '7y □"•nin"'^ nny n'rxn'i nm 
ny fT'sn pnn iDTd .cmins «in Dmn\T nse* ^id ^id "^''^n cpi ""n imy 
cnnM .cnmrs mxiN '733 '7K1B'"' ns im^v ptnn ntypn : nrrin minn ira*' 
c'tasB'Dm cpnn ■'s '7y i:njnm □'7iyn «m33 irosn Dnm^D moipo ^33 
pes K^ n-\-\r\n nn'? in Tiyn nmm3 To^nn nN isib' D"'r3n "'D''3 .nmn3 
Ton oniN mny minm «-n:T orK 'n'7 □'>nn"'n ipys cjorn ^33 .nx: '7K^B'•'^ 
ipoyi ^snc"' "'J3 13B''' cmn3i 3nnn n^3ty pn3 .nr:ymsn ■'JS3 Dnn3 nriMi 
.c^njn m:T'D33 nny'? en'? icssb' 'n-ijen nsn n« CTinrn i3«tr moD ,mina 
i«:ir ,c'nyn moiN .D-iian .n«3tri np ,iiKsp '7tr o-ia IQP ''N "in ^sntr'' 
,m« ]m:i ccna ijirn in3 is .c"'i3inn ^33 cnn cjiB'n cmn-'n n« Ton 
.^7!D"iKn cy^ mcnm CDinjn ysB* rf\-\nn nysB'm n-^^an 13 
I'i'SJ c^3T cma: .nm"'D0''7 i'?3 noo i-r-m minn iny n« ji3n ^mtri 
nn-'n n'7n3n ns'KB'n .cyn ■'3''y3 npi ■'^n nn''n minn .minn ncnp '7y 
minon inn,, :mpiJ"'n^ nc mnnsn .nmn3 □"'poiy □''J3 "'J3i c"i:3 m«n'7 
n^nty C3n TD'i'nn n-'n n'7\npa nnsj "'3n ".mm id^"" 3?^ ■':3 ?n3ii2 i3n 

.n'7"'^i noT* n-nn3 
,''nnii mn"' '73^ tisd nmnn ^tr p-innnn mnn pix-'si la^n '7B' D'7"iy3 

-1330 ^^310 vn cpioy -mii^ .c^-'pay d"'3^3 msn^ cron ^3d r''^ '^3 an"'T3i 
.Q^-n: '7y mn pyx'7 i'7innn nnyio cn^s |k'7 m^yn "'B'JS'7 yiu ncN3 .c'7"'3ty3 
">33 ^« ,m33^ -11DK ,cn3 ^^ynn'7 numtn 3''ik^ nn "^3^ cms myi '■jpt cp tn 
,ir3''i«D '7'7E'3 innsn nrn ji^ynn .cn'7 ion "c-nn: mo mc^ iJ'''7y„ ,npyx '7«i 
•lisB'n T'-r3y ct hk opr sin /'mxn ''3J« my,, :3in33 ms3 ijns 3": 'n "is 
pmc rrnu •'S '7y EiQy3 ipntr-'B' cniK yj3B'i yscn j^k Qn^3 lon^o' rn3n3i 
mn-'s c^yjn n3n ns n-'iKn m«i3T .n:nnNn cnys' nH^p'7 D''33ia nnyai 
.n^:nnKn i"'n3T nw d^d'? i'7 ]n: s^i cxn '7ty noD T''7y Titatsn ,''3D3 ,nrn iprn 
inyB'3 C3i'7 cyncn in^np ■'33 i^sj n33 ,im«j yxDS3 3nn ^s: n33 
0111333 «^N Dijinsi 3'7 ""aiDS «■? ,int3i cvq: riK im^iy •'jn noD n33 ,nm-ipn 
«Tin '-i '7XK '7"Tn n3T iD"pn3 ens .nniso nyotyj s'? npys i^isstr n^nioH 
nT3«n n^ism i^iks ims mwnpn nrmsn ^3k isib'j D"''7"'i3n pne' ,]VT\n p 
nn^ins ctjiyam aisnwan n33„ ,n33 .omn '7y k'7 ^3n cnTiisia ^y pn nx3 



— Fijty-Six — 



"JED nciKn DK Tnyn'7 inDo ijid'7 .c^iyn mn^i iks^ ,c^''n'7 -npo ntrncnn 
np'i'n'? irs r^T .linKt" cy j-'a pnr ^n tj'p tr"' .cyn ■'■'nai thm •'^3 nnn-'cn 

."inn ci"' ■'ID n^iy «in nmxc' ,nit2pn inm« 

ins "is",tr c: coys'?! ,nmK i^iy «in i^n icd2 .nmsn |c Nnn: ciKn 

.n:nnsn inn-ijn p ca n^nn nm«n nm« .n:yD^ im 

"ircsn en .ncisn cm '7t? no nfs •^■'tr cjtti irnn ,cip "o^a nna 
.ypip^ -ninsn i^c^tn T'on tdh idsh .nn^nn inD ,nm«:i yaij cinicndc 
nnsn .npnNn^ isa cjr^snn c^^k'tidhcd .cyn ■'ca qs nms 3Ty n't «in 
cKp-'icKn iCn'?: .cnTivisT ns cno I'i'cj c^nnnnco .^rm "'Q'-'^is Q'i'pa ncajr 
.cms cnmt' ^y cr^cn c^ay nmn i^kt jdi .mi2J2 

— ,t]DM-\up c'' inms^ '?n-\'^^ cy r- C^iki .cy ^d^ nmtrn km nmnn 
ns ins iyiT''T iX, : 'n •';:iv:^ nyiacn ns ^snty cy nits' k'? c'i'iy^ .Mn ib*? 
.n3'2nn '^k-ic'"' ps nmsc i^^tro cn"'n",2'7a isty: i^Kn c'^nn ns ".]yjD pK 
-m^noi'i c'7S« mNt2:3 i^tn^r, isaucn cnn"''? mpn mxix"": wdb' c'i'Dn |m« 
.csmj c^-i-.r; '7nc'? cmn^t" mtrsN nx-i« imtr^ cysc' mpnn .cnras tidi 
c« -ri- 'c-'i -mp "'D-' '7y ,pTiM "ryiT"' pny ^y .nispt^n m^Dn '7y in^n en 
n«T n'i'D — "HOTK,, ."rims'?,, st^jt ,cr ki2^ ."ij:: :Nin ■?«„ : nn^ ntyn'? 
.CDpcn m: ]'yD na hm .nrn'? ;isin ns cm mnn'?3 np-i^^in ,mB'3J ncn'7n 

ciT^scm cNincn m ns s-'t^m ,iDy'? inyn'^r ns 'n c-'p ,cjdni 
,-nm "'M — CB'nn c^m en'? njnj ,n^'7S n^:2 ns nsDS ^snti'"' p« .c'i'iaj'? 
.'?DC' s"?;! "'iMM nM cnnty cdm inn .nsipr naipn iicy'? •'th"''? niK'SiST 

nxnsD", npmD m^fo smi nmsn ns nmy sin .^nsn I'i'D — p'? ntryj n'JDn 

.ims 

I^K c^riD -.JK .'li-ims'? ^sTwy* cy r- '^Tn -icp uk'"'B' ,nsiD ,k'?s ps 
cn-'^n ns cnnpna ,cn3 rns nans ^tr prn is'n nr^s ,nj:nm nD'?3n ''ms ity-'^nn 

.rn'?inn nntn '?y cn%-iTD nump — psn lyn 

^sic" ps ns nua^ '731jt •'si'pn .u^nsn -"pi ci ny isc'"' s'?i ■'Si'i'n 
•^D^ ^:n-,-i T--1C — '?s"ity'' f»ns snnty •'133 'na nainsc pjna npm^i ,m^tya 

".cijn ^3 nnj"' n'''?s„B' Criyn 



■ Fifty-Seven ■ 



ms''D« ,nD;3 Tin rtmn i:« cKn irm3"»aD ^y c^anoD mtmh ^ty^o 
nT-ny riMsy hk u« c^sitr .i^«^ can c"»''Dtrn cj^-jy iiyi mmn"«i nnin^ 
nnN ?inr nn«D i« njw ctron iiya ns mp" no ?inD npncN nnn^ ^t? 
,ctr cmpo ]"'«i np''-iD«3 npnoK mn"*'? n^ny pKC nnu npmy^ n^Kca npnJEr 
nnjnn ^y "niN "iD"'trs''T laoinr" can .jnwt' pna mpo cwn ccipn pwc loa 
0*730 cipn N-n np''-iDKtt^ cnrnKn n^K '♦ea nnn .-nnsi '•mow nnn ^3« ,nn 
."iJxsnD 'n n« my^ c-'i'O'' .na ninj er-wi b'''M ^3 .••DiBn trsnon ,^aiDn mn-'^ 
cn-irxn '?3'7 nvnt intc ,n'»nyio '?v c-rn c"'3"''':y cwa naiyno nrK n^c^om 
-331 cnms n33 ,^3 ? um^ios npnoM n« ^spj k^i pi^na yiTo p cn '13i '131 
■"js '7y nnsD Tion mx^xon .rmn« mxiKi cny :\:i^n2 mv cs^h 'jb^ hdk 
vn"» i-isc '1 n«D nnoan ^np irsK cm3« .it3 cry n^nss nyoKnc n^ 
n« K"»n c« "on^ «^ p«3 ^y^r '^^"' n: "*3„ : pK^ pno T'n'»ty mpo ^33 ona 
n« n:w k'71 '^''y'ln «^ m^anon i» m^'i'iann cwi n3 na3 Kin i^b' »^ 
cnnNT cKn .n''3in .c^pi m3i nors nsoisnan .mnnn .Tijona .nn mK"»XDn 
cKn .cmsan c^onpHn Dn«nn ns M^urv k^ c«n .nncm t?an "'■•n rn k^ d» 
non no ?cki n^yo^ ny innn"" m3o!? ^N^s^^ nos ^y n'7y n^ mn"' ksti 
n"'yio ,^3n n« n:B' Kim K3 qmonm yaitron "nixn n^o-'nar noxn cm ? on^ 
.'7'?3n nK T'n">n k^i T'HM dk «"i3 cyn loy n« nas^: i3"'K inn trn .nt3 ont* 
ann^ 3^1 ci-'y p'''733 isn i3n ,nn'7D'»n nuoiTn'? n3n «i.-in cmton cyn ^3 
-iinon yran tr-iKa c'i'iyrt '?y Niyano .lyaoo nxn «in ""jonan ^nn^i dj«^ ,nw^i 
C3 nxnn m n« i^on nn'-mo nn-'xnn '7sr somrn n^« ,cnn n« nsc^ i^«n 
c^Kis^ mty N'7 n-jonan -x«T"''7"'irsn '73c' cwn mk .i^ isywo c^iyn ^3ty 
n-'H'' «■? nnns mxn«3cr n-oso -n .0.-13 "-pa inK r^i .•iion nuoiinn pni 
n't -mion c^iyn oKn ?n3iQ'7 ny'scro cim '?v np"'D'»^sn c«n ?nt3 n3T 
cnsToi ^i:y in'jy'? 313D0 ^33 c''3S'i^ cr« ckh ? .T-Jona nxT ok i33 n3c 
•r-nn "n n« -133 ^'?"'y^D nj-'K n-'io-un womtn OKm ? cnKioon cnmn oy 
:iDO ,cmTo ^yn id"'33"' c.c'o cton c^^nn ^3c 3cn^ ir^y K7n ? "•jpnosn 
'7V nx73io i-T,o-T3 n""'nn'7 "i^qvt op h^ cnn ? n-'ownpionn n-'xnK ^« .••mia 
niny: no .(1S44 r\:v2 ■•jr'? cncyn ^'7B''^ ns t'-'xntr sin) cnyn i3yty^ ipson 
03 K'pyn: c«i i:sit?^ 3W3tr nxn 'itr nyi'? ir^yi ?mxnKn ^30 nn jnKn 
'?y 3n3'? -713- ■•n''''n noK3 ?nTD n«i-in3 ni3'' i"n a^:y nvH '/^"i^ "-o ,cysn 
n«XD3 "JN n3c ir3D c:dh .npnoK '7V «pin is^i nrioi nrto t'3 '?» nnn* 
n«T «\-i '- nNDc nD«n riK c: idk'? m3tn '<'? v p 'jy nniK n3m« nowa '»?t 

.SIC? "''73n3 i^trv K^i c'7i3J'7 1315?"' mc nync 

lyvD '73n .cs'is nmo"' 'ry noDiso n:''s ny3 ni3:n m3nnn ^3 ^^33 
siynnn^ iDT n els'? niinu i^'-si o-^a-^yn ns msoDon mono nvioii 'ior ay'? 
nsi3:n '7S' ,c-na'snn nnipon ^s nis'^ ii^ y^c-in }ns3 psn nc'np .i^'-sk 
3nK'7 c"''?i3'' .n'''7S zvz''? unso nc'nm nrm s\t rsni cs3 nnic minn ^b? 
ni'7Q3 c3^nD r7"'S ps ^3s n3'7nn cyoo nsT o-'n-isioi .csxoi nac' psn ns 
SM. .'i'sntr'' pis ^c pi njtri mn"'^ ,i3'73 nns nrois'? v b'-'S '73'71 i^c nrsB? 

.mns s^i 



— Fifty-Eight — 



m n^n in: nj0258 

iDtp n-'n \n3 m3D3'7« 

ws: nK noD ivxy ibd3 

,iJX->K lya ,nB'npn ^y 

,i:nanD nya .n-'nnn jyo'? 

«2f mp'j cHna ncwai 

i^iruyn. m:D3^Ki, T'xsn'7 

.rn Kw^ nmcpn ik 

nryw •'ns^ ,nxk : -law 

nans muaa -"jriD n«i 

,mD^ "•:« ]3io lany ny? o 

.nnn ^^D ejid i^-'S'-'B' na 

: mm nn^ it hdcd 

"nnn ne^yi oyo id«„ 

— ntyy pi noK jd 

.nm T3 3np'7 ss"' 

3np'7 n«x''r nKTn Tn 
.«iB> — T-psn n«^o N^ 
n-'iBjn yinm narn (K-in) c'riy^ ■ 
.n'JHaj ^mt?'' m"! ^ytr 

CKnn nnna 3^n ^y i^y* iirioi 
,n''Din nn-'Btn nnnn nnn^o nK 

. . , "«» nM ps mjDS^K 



FiftyNiae 



58ir nD32 % mmii 

ncns nsD ,,""7"'n ntrw,, : 2 wp-^oz •'Jc^d nnn ''»«-i ,'7»ntr' nn^D ~ "-"3 
nwxiD n33 riN ,p .-'73 onn rr"23i "nt?D2 nn^s' nn'' .p^aw^ nn^e' n-T'i ■'jy? 
,rnpn2 .n^nrrn mancc n^JT'^sn 'js ns 'rjp'? rci^ nK rra^'trra .•'jyt' y-fo^ 'bmc' 

nn^ir nn^ ns .rran^nrtn m^iy n'^c^ nc^'s* d"??!: rrmK-' .ns^n 
:nK nny ly ,'7nis"' .I'i'SD mpiny i-fsm -:nc^ -laxn hk cn-'r^n n ,T!!r'"32 
Vn: npy^nan ri''n:{2n .-ftDipicnn ^tr c"'"'^Hn"'sn ,n"nnn ^n nn nns nDont' 

.^Kns^'' ric:i3 TiD^ .- ^^^J^ 

mTD"' n« nnmaa 'n'? ,n'7y3'7 njt3«: 'i'Kns*'' nn^a t?'n rn r.c^- pm 

nn"'n'7c km .n'7X2 man^ Knff ■•a ^a"? ^rr-'C^s^ njcs: ,^2n ^ixp '732 rrnjiax 

ri:mi .np'^n'? ncE' n''Q"'^22 nin"'a .i-fjan -n^ '723 p^nn ns:n n« n^M^ci 

■ij s^K K^n — na nn pn s'7 p-i^iDi 2n'7nn .s^ko 'ri'inn 7i«m ,cTn ]2n nn^ 

mny n:man '7"'nn nrs rr^nn^ ncpr -i^nnan ,''«Twr'' n«- "'^^iy P 
HTn-iy? ^''^DD cms "ir^ naccn n« ,n''m2 nr:^ ^::■Ta^ nn isn'7 --in •'^3 
^TTjn ci2 ;;Dn n«^~ t^y^^ .wrnn ctn no c^D7im c'i'ns'it? cc-rnn 
s'7C' nsnn '7N"ir"' nnis — ^■'nn nrs m^ 72k ,K3 rt^'"'' j-'ztr ,ri:r7 ii''p''p^ 
n:::snn c'i'iyn ^3 mpns' "ry cb^h'? cisn d^c i-ik"* w78 n^"''? f:: vn 72S'< 

.Kinn ,c'7"iyn ^3 nn n''''i3n ,na^tyn rt^';.s:!m 
cm3N^ Tiy n^nis" rn'7ic inn ,n:nt:n m 't .jtri: ;r"' ,p\m cy ,7k-is'"' p 
K^K ntrn'''7 m:73p «^ ''3 .untriT'c m3y h'7 cys E;t? .yirn miiyn cy -nn 
7ZS 173* 1-7133 nc'ty c"tH rrtyinnr ,Kin nciic^ ns-ro r^ ^n^nm .nfimc^ 
cyn c; .cnns? -ns'Tia nw idc^ •'7 -ids ''2^ rn-'crn m3T p"i 1^ pK nsyTiQi 
■»3 n^mn p7S3 .T'^y3 nn H^n ns"''7n- s^ cys ?si ri:-iK'7 pi3T nn-j: "'7ms*"'n 

.p.n C"'7y3 vr'H" "-n h'7 
ir'7y^ snnn "CD^n ^y„ .nrn int3T cnn c-ca c"^3:n u'7 ns^yc 'n i-;-i3 
n'>2{ri men nsc^3 ]V£„ .D''-ns3'', n3i:n3S' "coin "^y,, no oiy; ''sii -^-^s^ icw^ 
,nnDTS nn i^ncw? i-rnm f i!:;7 pix s'i'c' cjn) asiys ntry c"is«n ::."; /'rtp-ss 
! c'-^npn i3-!nj na .unnot? n7T: rra .'7s-is"rF niTKn ^-a c-r'7s^ ^:-^ mr.f3 
c-'^^iKn .:j"'^y ir«jitr ciar; titi tt 7D3 '3 '^•-''3 "[anti-K niH^u 7pi3 !s^ 
csr.s -iz nann u'7i3 .cnncim c'-T^jn c'^?^t?^ ,iKp''t2Ki-im c-'-is;:- ,c'"''3nym 
•T;ncTStD -n« 3:1 it'sh uac 7'7r'7 crt-T'3 n^y s?7 73^ cnir.-n^ :in^tf. irfnsm 
ntr,np ,cn"'mnss' ^^ 'n ctri n-T'7";ar[ nan''a3 inn umns .11^ nnp-m rts-npn 
ntrnp fn« 7"'3b>3 cc^ip m:3-ip uns ns rrnn cna .fn"' 2: c^nni man 
■r^ ntr ^y ^«nc'"' njtj 3iBn pss: nKoinm ncnpn .c^tmp Cw'^k n'' ^y 
fT'nTiDn 'mQD''n3 ^n: "< 3n Kin ^Knc^ nj^D nopn □: .lay •;p3Nn3 iry 
.n"Ty3 «^sn c"pn: 3"cn i-'k 'n ,''sa7 ncy ny3-i«3 ,n:tr^T; 
,-nna yia3 msj trn "73 '7t? rmc'Jim ',j'7c mtr^nnn hk n«n'7 '713-' "o 
cc'np cni ,c"'Dm'7n -rn« ^3 nn3 t>33 tut ,c''33an ''□d 2"y ,'7k-is"' mi3: 
'TKyDE'"' ■':3 '7yi ^:-i-nan ens '7y 'n ,]^nx: ns no-'i -iry n3T'«3 i^nnjc c^-nntii 
: mn n'7nan nDa3 •^um'? rc'Nnn n3Tn : n-'jyii n3'7in 'mtsD-'nn .c^snsn 
c'i'npa D^JB'ian c'i'DDn .miwn nu'73Dna CT'sn scin .^snc-a nojsn 
nnjB'nno cnpn qisx nfN ,n:wmn nDJ33 iSDNnn D3K'i t'Q3 ; ntrnn myntrD 
n'-nox ^t:^ niis'Kin nojsn n^'-nnn mj^ixn :n cv ,t33tr3 t'd3c ,njT''7yn 

.nxinn n^'B'ntr n'7ty^i 
T'3''i« ns ns: Dt?n mTy3 .n-'psn n« «'7d '7«-ib'"' ,"'n «3d ':'»-\v mi 
.npc"' kV ^«nc"' nsj "is .3np3 c"»''0"':3n c-'cipn '7y ts^nt^'B' n^pi^ pn3D 



Si'.i/v — 



S'P\ 



^^np ma 



■ry .TiS'' ^D^i mn ^3'7 t\'^t\)k\ D^ann m^^sn T'py ta^a nn hdb'K h^ .nnn 

sn ==3 ccn en onxp nm nunDtn on □"■ays nno ! tw\)^ '73k ,imip ^xs 
nras --nn ,Tsa cK^iDcn ■'oy ■'ia '?y laern nis'n kz pnKn cjioo -Hpn □rr'^y 
mn^ 'Tcn «^"i :nn ,^scr ^yi ro" ^y n^'nc^m nsnn ■'pnycD n^y .in^nn qia 
ills inDDC cn'yam cnns^n 'c-'^r\yr\ •'ir^c nt?ty pa .nn^ c: c^js'r e]ei ,|pn 

is'npi ip' 2D ,nri« C3 xvir^i ,crn nrnp '?y dcsj 
csnrss ,-'.'7Kn nmnian niDB'jn ,nT^s:n -s^h hudt nt? •'m'i'nn -rnKim 
-r.iK n: t-os .nrscn rto caaynoi cjn: ,n''DC~ ''cs'^ ^y ^^ csy D'^nxi □"'t'p 
1^121 p'7 i^iD ,ns''i mn: nn^ •'jsa miMTon ins dk n«nH ; '.^nnsB-o a-nn 
,-!,n"i""r!t22 ,-nH -n^^nn'?'. njypnnt' rx ^'^3: ppinsri nm .ts'np nmN i^id ,"iint3 
mrms "Tnpwm noK inxpD pn nr c: mei'jnn ^D3 ^3K .anm ^7m idk "i^a 

.-i2T' «ic mm^nnD p'jn o ,'T'ik3 

-S'JS ,n-TinM ''!:'j°2 i:n^^TE2 c^3D13 .c'ddiisid cjm cnn^n .isid'' ""^ tPH"" ^^, 
citnK □'713 ''3 iJ'7 mn cmp n^n -i3t ,,-nix ^^yni p-'^y ""cmp ,yiD •''7y3i nss^ 
csi .-i^D" Xw' ncipn3 ciip jui nx is-y c'7i3i c-'trnp c^isi citid d^13 
csip: cnmn^ ^^:3 iann:c ,npirn •« pi^Ti ,nt:'K -.k tr-'S ,Qirs c-'N i^'-ss 
72S .',:nnarc3 '7n:n 3n3 n^ynn en ''B'jn ps' ^3 ,ijd"' ccnp f^i cmnts 
?r-;-rpn ''ipr n'i'ynr ^"ri-N psD '?3d n^yc^i nijir msmcc m:-nD pt^"' nCTTpn cJ 
i-'-'D-in K7 r-nn c«t .n:''32'n ■'7J-i m33 nnn r; cina ■'oc*'? nyjn ."nntsm 
^nj-i -.---i mp"' n« rc-'^^n cjiinxn t'D"' ,□■''73.1 7k K3n: '^i ■'3 i:"'D3 T'n'3 

.inatyj 
n7y-irin d-,3c ins- .T^e^in cai mi3n n'?^'' nriaiEipn ■;m^"'y ^y d^ 
n-'-'Sn - --y ntr'7t:' is cjtr .cT^i^fs in7i:ic "-Ji ^y "innnn 'n isty t^s 
''^o .im-"'y3 'n cy ^y nmxn ixn mps i:i p^^n ^^snn^ T'D-nnB' '7y /n^ 
'.-ry^ inK in"»T ,n3-in n:nD3i inaa m«7nn ^d''3 en C5 i'72D .□■'■•n^ nKtr: 
i'7s: ,-Ty ■'a'7iy^ ty"D'' ,c''''"iT3«n cnxnn cnn tt' -ic«3 .nnnn «"'j^ n3i'7nn3 
n^"''7n n3i?n3i mnn □n-'^y q'7B' k^ 'n d33 pm «mjn inpn ^« □"•nnn r^ °n d^ 
n«"n:n nnsn nyii: cnn .c^nan nnyn ^« □k's: ^y its^Dii i'7nt djih: '7yi mp 
cy "CHT ^y nnytc m«pn3"inm nyxn ,'73Dm ii:"'n '7y ,«iu nnvn man ^y 

.cjnnKn Dn"'"'n ''D''3 ^np 
.□••s^^n n^B'Dt:'? n:wKnn n:c3 niyc i^sn cnntrn n*' '7y ii'7 ynj n33 
iniT'Dn '7'7:3 cE^nn ntrt?'7 idsd^i cmD-''7 •'3D iit: .'•jpt m"'"'y3 ,D'7iy^ ^"o'' 
csJiDB'nn ^27 □n''j3 •'i3'7 mN"i3 nx'^oK m-i3T nsipr nDp3 nn "it: ns r'7y ^np 
Tiya nystrnn •'^ys '73D n''i'7nnt!'m csn □■'iiinn nns .□min'i'T □ny'? cjDSJn 
T'Dts'n'7 nrT'n niwn n"iJ3n .□inT3K inr □■'■nD-''7 ;ii3nn^ "'13 nt noxoD «x'' 
"131 cw ijtr K'7 ""jpT nT''y3 c: ,nTn n^iyn m3^D '733 □■'iin'^n '73 ns nn'71 
Dm« i3''pn nan3i m« mixa crr'n^Dn .T'yn 133 '7n isd«j □mn-'n ; naita^ 

CONTINUED ON PAGE BE 



- '!ii}im<^ne — 



(x)sL JJumlc 
yjou. 




— Sixtv-Tivo - 



(^omptimenti oj- . , . 



(general ^^raunizati 



of 



(central Ljeiniua ^J^iak S^cnool 

for Kairls 



■ Sixty-Three ■ 



Compliments of . . . 



MR. & MRS. B. WEISER 
and Family- 



Compliments of . . . 

Mr. 6c Mrs. 

NATHAN HAUSMAN 

and Daughters 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
from the 

BERNSTEIN, BYRON, 

and 

BRODSKY FAMILIES 

Upon the Graduation of 

Sondra Elaine Bernstein 



Best Wishes from . . . 

MR. &MRS. A. SHAPIRO 

on the Graduation of Their Daughter 

Barbara 



• Sixty-Four 



Compliments of 



Mr. & Mrs. 

J. FRIEDMAN 

and Family 



Compriments of . . . 



Mr. & Mrs. 
MAX SCHReBER 

Sura - Aaron 
Malka - Mosha 

NEWARK, N. J. 



Compliments of . . . 

MIKE SCHECHTER, Inc. 

Kosher, Retail, 

Live Poultry 

1474 RALPH AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ESplonade 7-9076 



Compliments of . . . 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 
WOMEN'S ORG. 
Brooklyn Division 

MRS. JOSEPH S. GREENBERG 
President 



■ Sixty-Five 



Compliments of 



BARTON 
BONBONNIERES 



Best Wishes to 



Joyce Friedman 

and Her Fellow Graduates 

DR. & MRS. FRIEDMAN 
Shoshcma and Riva 



Best Wishes to 



Cyrella 
DAD, MOM, and ISAAC 



Compliments of 



CONGREGATION 
SHOMREI EMUNAH 

5202 - 14th AVENUE BROOKLYN 19. N. Y. 



Best Wishes irom 



DR. BENJAMIN ZOHN 



1449 UNION ST. BROOKLYN 13, N. Y. 



Congratulations to Our . . . 

Pearl 

LADIES AUXILIARY 
BIKUR CHOUM 

MRS. HELEN GOLDSTEIN. President 



Compliments of . 



MR. SAM COHEN 



■ Sixty-Six - 



To 



The Graduates 
from 

A FRIEND 



Compliments to . 



My Niece Nechie 
on Her Graduation 

HANNAH WILLIG 



Compliments oi 



MORTON J. RICHTER STUDIOS 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. GOLOMBECK 



Compliments of 



BESTFORM 
FOUNDATIONS, Inc. 



MR. & MRS. JESSE DEUTCH 

Compliments of , . . 

SCHNALL PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers of 

Tarn Tov Kosher Cheese 

Best Wishes to . . . 

Phyllis Hausman 

from 

A FRIEND 

For A Speedy Recovery for . . . 
Mr. Hausman 

from 
A FRIEND 

Compliments of . . . 



Rabbi & Mrs, 
OSI.AS HOROWITZ 



— Sixty-Seven • 



Compliments of . . . 

PERRY BROS., Inc. 
Manufacturers 

220 Flushing Avenue Brooklyn. N. Y. 



Best Wishes to . . . 

Cy r el 1 a 
irom 

MR. & MRS. JOSHUA ISLER 



Compliments of 



MARCIA MARGULIES 



Congratulations to a Dear Girl 



Pearl Karalitzky 



MRS. IDA CITRIN 



Good Luck to 



Pearl 

on Her Graduation 

MR. A. MEIERS 



Compliments of 



MET FROZEN ORANGE JUICE 



Compliments of . 



MR. & MRS. NATHAN RYSKIND 



Best Wishes to . . . 

The Graduates 
from the 

PARENTS TEACHERS ASS'N 

MRS. LESTER BERLIN, President 
MRS. AARON SCHWARTZ, Vice Pres. 

From ... 

MOISHE, JOSEPH & NISSON 

to 

Our Sister Sarah 

on Her Graduation 

Compliments of . . . 

DEUTSCH'S FROSTED FOODS 

Kosher Made, Frozen Fresh Meats 

1163 - 48th Street Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

FRIEDMAN'S 
957 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y. 

From . . . 

PERRIE, GOLDIE & HESHY NAGEL 



■ Sixty-Eight - 



To 



Kranchy 

Mazel Tov on Your Graduation 

MR. & MRS. L. CLICK & FAMILY 



Best Wishes to . . . 

Kranchy 
from 

GRANDMOTHER & LOUIS 



Mazel Tov to . . . 

Tzivia Lewko 

from 

HAPOEL HAMIZRACHI 

OF EAST NEW YORK 

Best Wishes to . . . 

Esther Schnall 
from 

UNCLE MORRIS, AUNT ELLA 
cmd Family 

Congratulations to . . . 

Sarah Berlin 
from 

BERTHA SCHRAETER 



Compliments of 



MRS. IDA SHAKEN & DAUGHTERS 



Compliments of . . . 

MORIS & SELIG KRASNA FAMILY 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. lACK BASSIUR 
and Daughters 

Greetings and Best Wishes to . . . 

Our Niece Joyce 

UNCLE NATHAN, AUNT LOUISE 

and Family 

Compliments of . . . 

ABE STRULOWITZ 
Kosher Butcher 



Mazel Tov to . 



Kranchy Schonfeld 

from 

ROSE TALANSKY 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. L. GARDENBERG 



Sixly-iSine - 



Compliments oi . 



Mr. 6c Mrs. 
HERMAN WINTER 
Debra and Robert 



Compliments oi 



CLASS 2B 



Compliments of . . 



CLASS 4A 



Compliments oi 



CLASS 6A 



Compliments of . . . 



CROWN HEIGHTS YESHIVA 



Compliments of 



CLASS 2A 



Compliments of 



CLASS 2C 



Compliments of . . . 



CLASS 4B 



Compliments of 



CLASS 6B 



— Seventy 



Compliments of . . . 

YEADY and AL 
COLLENSTEIN 

231 KINGSTON AVE. BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

Mr. & Mrs. 
SAMUEL GITLOW 



Compliments of . . . 

ZUCHERBRAUN, CHESIR 
CORP. 

Wholesale Dry Goods 

560-562 BROADWAY KEY/ YORK !2, N. Y 



Compliments of 



ROYAL PLEATING and 
STITCHING CO. 



684 BERGEN ST. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Mazel Tov to . . . 



Tzivia Lewko 

from 

MOM, POP & LIBBY 



Compliments of . . . 

HOROWITZ-MARGARETEN 

Makers of 

"The Matzoh With The Taste" 
and Other Quality Kosher Foods 

Compliments of . . . 

RABBI <S MRS. R .H. MARCUS 
and Family 

Friends of . . . 

ANN MARCUS 



Compliments of . . . 

WASHINGTON PAINTS SUPLY CO. 

5017 New Utrecht Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



IN MEMORY OF 
MOTHER 

SARAH KAUFMAN 



— Seventy-One ■ 



L^ompumentd of . . . 



MITTMAN'S BUTCHER SHOP 



MR. & MRS. EUGENE STEINMETZ 



SMILING JOE FRUIT CENTER 



JACOB BERMAN, Ph.G. 



MR. & MRS. BERNSTEIN 



JOE FREIFELD 



D. STEIGMANN 



MR. & MRS. J. KLEIN & DAUGHTER 



MR. & MRS. EDWARD EHERLICH 



MR. & MRS. SIDNEY SEIGFRED 
and Family 



MR. & MRS. HYMAN LEVINE 



ELIAS WOLK (Butcher; 



LEVITAN FAMILY 



DIAMOND'S PHARMACY 



BARNET RIEGER 



PARK FRUITERERS 



A FRIEND OF TZIVIA LEWKO 



RACHMAN BAG CO. 



A FRIEND of HELENE GARTENBERG 



MR. <S MRS. WILLIAM KRIEGER 



FRIENDS OF CELIA LEWKO 



DR. HYMAN I. FALK 



NAT'S DAIRY 



DAVID TESSER 



A FRIEND OF CYRELLA CHAVEL 



A FRIEND OF NECHIE DEUTSCH 



A FRIEND OF SARAH R. BERUN 



HARRY & ISSIE VEGETABLE MKT. 



A FRIEND OF SUSAN WEISER 



JERRY'S BAKE SHOP 



RABBI & MRS. AARON POMERANTZ 



A FRIEND 



WILKINS DAIRY 



DR. S. N. SANDERS 



RABBINOWITZ FAMILY 



SHULAMITH & ELLIOTT MOSS 



MR. & MRS. M. J. GOLOMBECK 



SeveniY-Tivo —